Population, Family Planning,
& Ecology News Digest
Archives January - June 1999

Recent News
Archives Sep 2001 -forward
Archives May-Aug 2001
Archives Jan-Apr 2001
Archives Sep-Dec 2000
Archives May-Aug 2000
Archives Jan-Apr 2000
Archives Jul-Dec 1999
Archives Jan-Jun 1999
Archives 1998

  • June 26, 1999 AP July 19 - U.S. Census Bureau Predicts a Record-Breaking 6 Billion People. The US. Census Bureau says the Day of 6 Billion will be July 19, although the United Nations Population Fund, has declared Oct. 12 to be the official "Day of Six Billion." The US Census Bureau assumes a slightly higher fertility rate, which explains the three-month discrepancy. Neither figure should be mistaken for hard fact. Both projections are based on census figures up to a decade old. It from the beginning of human history to 1804 to reach 1 billion. It took just 12 years to leap from 5 billion to 6 billion. In the 19th century global population grew by only 600 million, but in the 20th century it grew by 4.4 billion. There are twice as many people today as there were in 1960. Even with a continued decline in fertility rates, the United Nations projects a population of 8.9 billion in 2050. With current trends, world population isn't expected to stabilize until after 2080.
  • June 30, 1999 Africa News Service Poverty and the Environment Moving the Agenda Agenda 21, the blueprint for sustainable development developed at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held at Rio de Janeiro, has not seen the rapid progress we had hoped for. While the growth rate of ozone-destroying chemicals has been slowed, but there has been little progress on global warming. Wealthy and developing nation governments are subsidizing the misuse or overuse of natural resources. Deforestation continues to pose a threat to biodiversity and to livelihoods. 2 billion people still cook with traditional fuels, 1.5 billion lack access to electricity, and millions of women and girls spend hours daily looking for wood for cooking, taking time they could spend in school or earning money. The UNDP is pilot-testing projects for food security, sustainable forestry, water resources management and sustainable natural resource exploration.
  • June 30, 1999 San Diego Earth Times Courting the Nemesis Effect:Your Extinction or Mine?  Like withdrawing from the planetary ATM without ever having to worry about the balance. In semi-arid San Diego county, massive housing developments will drain the county even more of the life giving resource, water. Lawns replace non-native vegetation. The Colorado river no longer runs to the Sea of Cortez, but new golf courses are built every year. 1 million more people are expected to move into the county in the next few years. Instead of encouraging mass transit in any significant way, coastal cities keep widening the roads and inviting more auto-dependent residents to the area.
  • June 30, 1999 Inter Press Service Zimbabwe: Contraceptive Shortage Leads to Baby Boom.  In Dzivarasekwa, a sprawling low income high-density suburb, and in rural areas, health departments are reducing their budgets and which have also given priortity to treatment of HIV related diseases, have no money to buy contraceptives. Contraceptives, which may be expired, are peddled in the streets at double the price. Zimbabwe's family planning program had been relatively successful, with 42% of married women of childbearing age using contraceptives, but 85% had been obtaining services from council and government clinics. Many women are willing to pay for the contraceptives if they were available.
  • June 30, 1999 Xinhua UN Begins Session On Population Issues.   UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, addressing the session, said that since the first population conference 25 years ago, fertility in developing countries has dropped from 5 to less than 3 children, family planning has increased from 30% to 60%, child mortality has gone from from 140 per 1,000 live births to only 80 now, average life expectancy has risen to 66 from 59 years, and the number of women who die in child birth has equally declined. Globally, the growth rate as slowed from 2 to 1.3% per year,". However, girls get less education than boys, many women cannot choose when to be pregnant, there is still a prevalence of sexual violence, unsafe abortion and sexually transmitted diseases.
  • June 30, 1999 Agence France Presse Contraceptive Debate Clouds UN Session on Population Growth.   By 2025, world population will reach 8 billion, 8 times what it was in 1930. Currently it is growing by 78 million a year, 97% of the growth in the poorest countries. There are one billion people of childbearing age (15-24), more than ever before, and most of them in poor countries with no access to sex education or birth control. Wealthier nations were to pay one-third of the 17 billion dollars a year needed, but only 9.5 billion dollars a year was collected, 7.5 billion of it paid by developing countries. Developed nations were to pay 0.7% of their GDP, but now pay only 0.25%.
  • June 30, 1999 Xinhua China Gives Priority to Cairo Program of Action.  At the U.N. General Assembly, China's representative Wang Zhongyu said that China has incorporated it's population program into the overall program for socio-economic development. The population program is now opposed to the use of coercive measures, with more emphasis on publicity and education campaigns, providing quality services in reproductive health and family planning and bringing into play the role of the civil society and NGOs. Family planning program in the rural areas has been combined with economic development, poverty-alleviation, universal education programs and improvement of women's status. However, it's increase of about 12 million people a year is still a problem.
  • June 30, 1999 Deutsche Presse-Agentur / AP U.N. Holds Special Meeting on Curbing Population Growth.   Wednesday the U.N. General Assembly began a 3-day session to assess whether measures adopted five years ago at Cairo have worked to curb the global population growth, which is expected to reach 9.8 billion in 2050. By 2000, programs to help family planning are estimated to cost 17 billion dollars a year and increasing to 21.7 billion by 2015. But governments have failed to provide those promised financial resources. The Vatican and some Islamic factions are still objecting to features of the plan like safe abortions, sex education for young people, and even family planning. The premise that educated women with access to reproductive health care have fewer children "seems blindingly obvious now" said U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.
  • June 26, 1999 Sacramento Bee U.S. Biologists Permit Boost in Water Flows through Delta: Increased Pumping may Aid Farmers at Expense of Threatened Fish Needed to ease a water shortfall to San Joaquin Valley crops, and to keep the San Luis Reservoir from dropping too low for health and safety reasons, the increased pumping was ordered. For unknown reasons the threatened Delta smelt have lingered near the water project pumps and have been killed - more than the federal protection plan permits, but what portion it is of the total population is unknown.
  • June 25, 1999 PRNewswire Dryland Salinity Threatens Australia.   Australia is faced with economic, environmental and social challenges due to changes in the last 50 years from an ecology that minimized runoff and groundwater recharge to the massive conversion of native bush to agriculture. The resulting salinization of the soil has caused damage to building foundations, bridges, pipelines and roads and necessitated the use of salt tolerant crops. In South Australia, 20% of surface water is too saline for human consumption.
  • June 24, 1999 ENN Fuel Cell Engines Win Top Honors A fuel cell engine finished second in its debute at the Department of Energy 1999 FutureCar Challenge. It's fuel cell/battery hybrid engine, working by converting the chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity and heat without combustion, also received an award for lowest emission. The team used an Energy Partners fuel cell in a 1998 Chevy Lumina. Another fuel cell vehicle won top honors last month at the 1999 Northeast Sustainable Energy Association Tour De Sol electric vehicle road rally.
  • June 30, 1999 PRNewswire City of Detroit Disagrees with Population Estimate Released by U.S. Census Bureau.   "In 1996, the Census Bureau estimated our population at 1,000,272. Two years later they say that our population has decreased by more than 30,000. With Detroit's dynamic growth in recent years, strong real estate market, and increased demand for housing, such a drastic decline could not be possible."
  • June 29, 1999 AP Government Ships Salmon Downstream, Hoping They Swim Back on Their Own.   For the past 2 decades, approximately 200,000 live Chinook salmon have been barged past dams down the Columbia River. Only 1% make it back upstream. The dams provide flood control, irrigation and hydropower. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers is considering whether to remove four of the eight dams -- the ones on the Snake River.
  • June 29, 1999 AP Global Warming, Sea Level Rise May Be Higher than Predicted.   Based on a report from the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, the earth's surface may increase temperatures in the next hundred years by 2.3 to 7.3 degrees Fahrenheit, rather than the 1.4 to 6.3 degrees previously predicted.
  • June 29, 1999 Xinhua Fish Losing Environment Struggles on Upper Reaches of Yangtze.  Paddlefish, mullet, and sturgeon are threatened or have disappeared. The variety of fish from 50 in the 1960's to 20 due to over-fishing, water pollution, and water facility construction.
  • June 29, 1999 Xinhua China Grows High-Yield Paddy Rice on Desert.  In a technique using "a nutrient box" for the paddy rice seedlings, high yield rice is being produced in the desert. Abundant sunshine and day- night temperature variations increase sugar and protein contents 10-20% more than ordinary crops. Such rice is not contaminated due to less pollution and fewer harmful insects in desert areas. 16% of China's land is desert.
  • June 20 Audubon FY2000 Population Funding - you can help!
  • June 27 1999 London Guardian Aids is Draining Life from South Africa.  Hospitals face financial collapse under the strain of treating millions suffering from aids. Only the fittest will survive. Disintegration of mainstream medical facilities threatened. 500 babies a year are expected to die because they would not be able to get respiratory assistance in neonatal units.
  • June 26 1999 Reuters Latin Americans Stake out Positions on Population.  Latin American participants to the U.N. conference on Population and Development, particularly Peru, Chile, Brazil and Venezuela, say they have reached their limit in making concessions to conservative countries Libya, Sudan and Morocco as well as Argentina, Nicaragua and Guatemala. The Latin American objectors had support from Costa Rica, El Salvador, Panama, Uruguay, Bolivia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and South Africa. Peru, for example, wants devising new reproductive health programmes, laws to punish rape and for women to advance in government. The conservatives have objected to the Cairo pledge to ensure safe abortions where they are legal and the "emergency contraception" pill.
  • June 26 1999 Xinhua Snow-Covered Areas Shrinking in Peruvian Andes, losing over 11 billion cubic meters of snow 20 in glacier areas in 27 years due to global warming and carbon monoxide pollution from vehicles. This will mean irreversible to the ecosystem, and a loss of water and tourism resources.
  • June 26 1999 Xinhua Chinese Cities Face Huge Air Pollution Tasks.   Beijing, Shanghai, Xi'an, Lanzhou and Shenyang and other Chinese cities is still have much worse air quality than that of major foreign cities. Beijing ranks third of the world's 10 most polluted cities, seven of them are in China, according to a 1998 World Health Organization report.
  • June 26 1999 Xinhua Sex Knowledge Being Spread in Beijing to teenagers. Handbooks, television programs, highschool curriculum, and other media cover reproductive health and biology, including interviews with professionals, lectures, knowledge contests, and stories of daily life, - to form attitudes about love, marriage and family life.
  • June 27 1999 Earth Times News Vietnam Honored for its Effort to Control its Rapid Population Growth.   The average Vietnamese family had six children in 1965, now it has 2-3. The population is expected to grow only 1.8 percent next year and to attain zero growth by 2005. The Vietnamese population committee was given the UNFPA award on June 9. A nation of 78 million people, Vietnam has only 0.1 hectares [about one-quarter acre] of arable land per capita. In 1995, 60% of women were using contraceptives, mostly supplied by the government. $87 million of the family planning funds came from the UNFPA. Life expectancy has risen from 45 in 1960, to 65-70 years currently. Financial incentives are offered for various family planning methods, while disincentives, such as higher land rent, are applied to families with over 2 children. Maternal deaths are high, at 150 for every 100,000 births - 88% of these can be prevented. Abortion rate is high, 40% of pregnancies end in abortion, many women having two or three abortions.
  • June 23 1999 Xinhua Tibetans in Southwest China Having Fewer Children.   In the 1970's Tibetans were encourages to have Tibetans in the prefecture in western Sichuan were allowed to have two or three children at the beginning of the China's one- couple-one-child policy because birth rates were low and the average life expectancy was only 29. In the 1980s life expectance rose to 55 and population increased from 480,000 to 870, 000 in five decades.More families now prefer to have one child, and herdsmen, who were allowed to have three children, now want only two.
  • June 23 1999 Business Wire 10 Billion Dollars (U.S.) Needed to Save Mediterranean from death by pollution, according to an international conference. 20% of the world's crude oil is transported through the Mediterranean, and countries with intensive agriculture use large amounts of fertilizers and pesticides which end up in the Mediterranean. Italy spreads two million tons of phosphates and nitrates on its fields each year, most ending in the sea.
  • June 22 1999 Seattle Post Time for Parity on Contraceptives Parity for prescription drug coverage, will now be taken up in Congress. Insurers rushed covering the expense of the male impotence drug Viagra, while most women still must bear the expense of avoiding unwanted pregnancies. Only 39% of the HMOs and 15% of insurance plans cover all 5 methods of reversible contraception: the pill, IUDs, diaphragms, Norplant and Depo Provera. Women spend 68% more than men on out-of-pocket health care expenses. Greater access to contraceptives will result in fewer abortions. Cost to insurers is about $1.43 per month per employee.
  • June 23 1999 Business Wire Wind Power Number One Choice of Electric Consumers.  In California, wind power has increased by 5 megawatt and popularity is growing, but not enough to meet California's carbon dioxide reductions for electricity as required for the Kyoto summit. Wind generated electricity needs to increase from 1% to 17%, according to the report, "Wind Energy, Green Marketing and Global Climate Change," sponsored by the California Regulatory Research Project of the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies. Colorado has entered into a public-private partnership to reduce CO2 emissions by 3-4 million tons. Germany, Denmark and Spain account for 70% of recent global wind power capacity additions.
  • June 23 1999 PRNewswire Congress Considers Family-Friendly Climate Change Bill.  The tax credit bill, H.R. 1358, introduced by Rep. Bill Thomas (R-CA), will offer incentives for energy-efficient houses. "We have the ability to act decisively today to make our homes more affordable, less polluting, and more comfortable, and help save American families millions of dollars on heating and cooling bills," said Alliance to Save Energy President David M. Nemtzow. Less than 2% of new homes actually achieve a high level of energy efficiency and the average home generates twice as much greenhouse gas emission as a car.
  • June 22 1999 PRNewswire Levotech will Test 7-Day Contraceptive Transdermal Patch in China
  • June 22 1999 UPI Senate Passes Bill Including UN Funds of $926 million as partial payment on the $1.6 billion debt the world body says the US owes. The Senate version does not have the anti- abortion provision, but in the House Rep. Christopher Smith, R-N.J., wantsnone of the funds go to family planning organizations that permit abortions.
  • June 24 1999 ENN Report Predicts Decade of Super-Disasters.   The combination of human-driven environmental changes, (climate change due to global warming and desertification) on one hand and increasing poverty and growing shanty towns on the other, will set off chain reactions of disaster, according to the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. The number of people needing their assistance rose from 500,000 to 5 million in just 6 years. For example, when El Niño struck Indonesia, it caused the worst drought in 50 years and consequently the rice crop failed, the price of imported rice quadrupled, the currency dropped by 80%, food riots erupted in the capital, and massive forest fires burning out of control in the countryside resulting in a toxic layer of smoke. 40 of the 50 fastest-growing cities are located in earthquake zones. Environmental refugees account for some 58% of all refugees worldwide. 60% of the world's population will be living in potential malarial zones by 2100. 3 million people per year are made homeless by flooding.
  • June 19 1999 Worldwatch Cities Hold the Key to Planetary Health.  Worldwatch Institute has released a paper, Reinventing Cities for People and the Planet, in which cities occupy 2% of the Earth's surface, yet emit 78% of the carbon from human activities, 76% of industrial wood use, and 60% of the water tapped for use by people. "Urban systems are undermining the planet's health and failing to provide decent living conditions for millions of people." London requires 58 times its land area for food and timber for its residents, which would require three more Earths if everyone lived that way. 600 million city dwellers in the developing world do not have adequate shelter and 1.1 billion choke on unhealthy air, including 3 million deaths in China from toxic urban air in 1994-1996. One-tenth of the population, 160 million people, lived in cities in 1900. Half the world (3.2 billion people) will be urbanites by 2006. Copenhagen, Denmark, Chattanooga, Tennessee offer unique solutions.
  • June 21 1999 ENN Alaska Glacier Traveling Quickly, increasing its speed from 82 feet per day to 115 feet per day, the tidewater glacier Columbia is now the world's fastest moving glacier. It is 34 miles in length, three miles wide and more than 3,000 feet thick in places. The end of the glacier rests in waters 300 to 600 feet deep but may soon be resting in waters that are 2,000 feet deep, causing more calving into icebergs. Global warming may be the cause.
  • June 21 1999 ENN 15 Most Endangered Wild Lands in the U.S. Named by the Wilderness Society, blaming over-logging, oil and gas development, off-road vehicle use, and various forms of noise pollution. Listed are: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska; Cascade Crest, Washington; Copper River Delta in Chugach National Forest, Alaska; The Everglades, Florida; Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona; Greater Yellowstone, Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho; Klamath Basin, California and Oregon Maine's North Woods; Medicine Bow and Routt National Forests, Wyoming and Colorado; Mojave National Preserve, California; Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia and Florida; Owyhee Canyonlands, Idaho; Sierra Nevada Old-Growth Forest, California; The Sonoran Desert, Arizona; and The Utah Wilderness. Also listed are: Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska, Great Smokey Mountain National Park in Tennessee and North Carolina and Tongass National Forest in Alaska.
  • June 18 1999 ENN Asia Dam Called Disaster Waiting to Happen.  Sarez Lake in Tajikistan, at an elevation of 10,700 feet (3265 meters), was formed as the result of a landslide triggered by a 1911 earthquake. The United Nations International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction office has warned that the leaking dam could be breached, sending a 300-400 feet (100 meter) wall of water down a narrow gorge and killing hundreds of thousands of people, and flooding areas of Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, displacing another 5 million people.
  • June 16 1999 ENN Bt May Be Unsafe for Organic Farming according to a report in the May 29 issue of New Scientist, Bt spores caused lung inflammation, internal bleeding and death in laboratory mice. Last year, a strain of Bt, H34, was found that that destroyed tissue in the wounds of a French soldier in Bosnia. While H34 is not used as a pesticide, commercial strains of Bt also killed some mice.
  • June 16 1999 ENN Lab Develops Engine For the Future.   Developed by the U.S. Department of Energy, the thermoacoustic Stirling heat engine contains no moving parts, is constructed of common materials, it requires little or no maintenance, and can be manufactured inexpensively. Could be used in homes for electricity cogeneration. In the concept of the engine, derived in part from a principle outlined by a 19th century Scot, Robert Stirling, helium is compressed in a cool chamber and then transferred to a heated chamber heated where the gas expands and drives a piston. When it cools it returns to the colder chamber and the cycle begins again. The process is environmentally friendly and up to 30% efficient while internal combustion engines are 25-40% efficient.
  • June 15 1999 ENN Clean Up Danube River Now.  The World Wide Fund for Nature said the 1,740-miles long Danube is polluted with toxic chemicals and oil, as a result of the bombing of oil refineries and chemical plants in the NATO air campaign against Serbia. The source of drinking water for 10 million people in Yugoslavia, Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova and Ukraine, it supports some of Europe's last and richest natural wetland regions, including its vast and globally important delta.
  • June 19 1999 World Entertainment News Network Geri Halliwell: Catholics Know What They Want.  In her controversial trip to the Philippines, United Nations Goodwill Ambassador Geri Halliwell encouraged Filipino women to use contraceptives. Catholics know what is best for them and don't need the church or the Pope to tell them, she said.
  • June 21 1999 PRNewswire New Emission-Free 'Waste to Energy' Process.   Toups Technology Licensing, Inc. has introduced a new, high-volume "garbage to gas" technology called PCE(TM) (for Pyrolitic Carbon Extraction Process)(TM), which can turn hydrocarbon-based household garbage and industrial waste into a clean-burning gas and valuable carbon black. The gas, Phoenix 777, demonstrates exhaust and combustion properties superior to natural gas but emits less than half of the carbon dioxide emissions of natural gas and virtually no carbon monoxide or hydrocarbons. It can deliver about 1 megawatt per 16 tons of waste, a rate about 23 times more efficient than some of the best existing waste to energy (incineration) technologies. The average American uses 3.3 kilowatt hours per day of electricity and the EPA says that same American produces 4.4 pounds of garbage per day (3.5 tons of hydrocarbon-based waste per average family of five per year.) The EPA reports that hydrocarbon- based garbage represents 86% of the U.S. waste stream. 16% of the waste stream, is incinerated, sending out toxic fly ash. Landfills produce leachate, or "garbage juice," a toxic runoff that can contaminate groundwater.
  • June 21 1999 U.S. Newswire Scientists from across the Nation Descend on Capitol Hill to urge lawmakers to heed their warnings about global warming. Congress seems to be in denial.
  • May 18 1999 JHUCCP Condom Use Must Triple To Curb Spread of HIV/AIDS and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections.   Condom use should rise globally from the current 6 to 9 billion condoms a year to 24 billion. Results are printed in a report, Closing the Condom Gap. In surveyed countries 5% to 33% of never-married men say they have started using condoms to avoid AIDS while 71% of condom need is among sexually active unmarried men. In Malawi 52% of respondents delayed first sex or stopped sex and 24% began using condoms.
  • June 21 1999 Xinuha China Produces Cloned Embryo of Giant Panda, introducing the cells of a dead female panda into the egg cells of a white rabbit. They are now trying to place the embryo in the womb of a selected host animal which hopefully won't reject it. The panda's extinction is predicted in the next 25 years.
  • June 14 1999 New York Times Less Family Planning in Guatemala. In reference to the family planning success story of Mexico, Frederick Meyerson, the project director at the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy, points out that not all Latin American countries are as fortunate. In Guatemala, where the Government is less supportive of family planning, only 27 percent of women use modern contraception (compared with 56 percent in Mexico), and the average woman has about five children. As a result, the population in Guatemala -- where land is already scarce -- is projected to double or triple in the next 50 years. About a billion people living in the developing world are in the prime childbearing years of ages 15 to 24. There are two billion more future parents right behind them. It would be wise and cost-effective for Congress to increase spending on international family planning and reproductive health.
  • June 9 1999 San Diego Union Smart growth only treats symptoms. From an op-ed by Meredith Burke - "smart growth" policies are but short-term solutions. The evidence points to accelerating losses of land and species. In 1972, the President's Commission on Population Growth and the American Future asked 'what should be the country's optimum population?', not 'how do we manage growth?' Have Americans abandoned their love of privacy, single-family homes with a garden, cities small enough to foster a sense of community, uncrowded recreation land, and wilderness that doesn't require reservations to visit? If so, this hasn't shown up in the surveys. Established neighborhoods are fighting being retrofitted at higher densities a la smart growth; residents want child-friendly, low-traffic-volume roads.By 2025, California's population is projected to increase by 20 million, having already increased from 10 million in 1950 to 35 million today. Without a commitment to population stabilization, U.S. population will approach a half-billion in the year 2050.
  • June 18 1999 Reuters Climate Change to Increase European Health Woes Could cause major health problems in Europe such as an increase in malaria and encephalitis. Rising temperatures and changes in rainfall patterns could cause flooding, disrupt water supplies and sewage disposal and cause toxic waste sites to overflow. Warming may lead to the reintroduction of insect-borne diseases such as malaria in Eastern Europe.
  • June 18 1999 InterPress Service Earth Charter USA Responsible Ethics towards the Earth The Earth Charter is an international statement that combines a "declaration of interdependence and responsibility with guidelines for building a global partnership for sustainable development." The goal is to present the document to the United Nations for adoption in 2002. Americans have shown increasing interest in seeking to "slow the pace of destruction" that excessive consumerism has on American society and American values. The Earth Charter National Training Conference wll be held on June 20 and 21, in Alexandria, Va. For more information call 202/778-6133.
  • June 14 1999 ENN Sprawl Gets the Blame for Shrub-land Fires in southern and central-coastal California, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. Fire suppression not to blame.
  • June 14 1999 ENN Wilderness Needed for Ecological Functionality The current network of congressionally-designated wilderness areas in western Montana are unable to maintain complete aquatic ecosystems.
  • June 3 1999 Pew Poor Countries Can Grow Despite Energy Curbs In a report released by the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, developing countries that adopt alternative power generating strategies, such as natural gas and renewable energy, can boost energy capacity while curbing greenhouse gas emissions by 25% and reducing local pollutants. The economic benefits would be the same. Rather than building new power plants, increasing the efficiency of existing electricity systems could lower energy prices and reduce greenhouse emissions by up to 10%. Current practices are likely to triple their carbon dioxide emissions over the next 20 years. Electricity generation is responsible for 1/3 of carbon emissions worldwide -- about 1/3 of which came from developing countries (as measured in 1995). Developing countries are now attempting to bring electricity to nearly two billion people who are currently without it. Changes to investment decisions could reduce carbon emissions 2.5% and emissions of pollutants like sulfur and nitrogen oxides by far more.
  • June 2 1999 AP Americans Want Sex Education "Nine in ten people said information about contraception, birth control and condoms should be given to 11th and 12th graders. And 95 percent said those students should get information about abstinence."
  • June 15 1999 Washington Times U.S. 'Population Pyramid' Deemed to be Upside-Down; Physicist Urges Having Larger Families. An interview with Jim Sedlak, director of Stop Planned Parenthood International (STOPP)was published in the Washington Times. "I have calculated that if every five people lived in a single family house on a 75-by-90 foot plot of land, the world population could be fit into Texas." The real problem is under-population. He denies the US Census Bureau's statistics that predict a continually increasing population through 2050. STOPP's website is based at the headquarters of the American Life League at www.all.org. ... Responses can be sent to Letters Editor, The Washington Times, 3600 New York Avenue, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002, Fax: (202) 269-3419, letter@twtmail.com, or http://www.washtimes.com/letters/letters.html
  • June 16 1999 House of Representatives Family Planning Blamed for Youth Violence in the House of Represnetatives
  • June 20 1999 NYT US Aims to Have 5% of Power from Wind by 2020, an increase of 0.1% from now. Other renewable energy contenders are electricity from the sun or from biomass. Windmills are good cash producers for farmers, who can grow crops in their shadow. Price per kilowatt-hour of wind power has declined from 40 cents in the 1970s to 5 cents now. The average resident pays 7 cents per kilowatt hour.
  • June 20 1999 NYT Kuwaitis Debate Giving Women the Right to Vote, announced in an edict by the emir. The religious issue is subject to interpretation - Shiite Muslims in neighboring Iran allow women to vote and hold office, while Sunnite Muslims say the Koran forbids women from holding leadership postions. Arab and Islamic countries like Egypt, Pakistan, Iran, and Indonesia already allow women to play prominent roles. Neighboring Qatar has allowed women to vote in a recent municipal election. Women in Kuwait still do not have the right to drive, but do comprise 31% of the work force.
  • June 16 1999 Sacramento Bee Water Pollution, TMDL, and the American Farm Bureau. Non-point source pollution and sedimentation that wash into streams from roads, fields, and other places, still impacts waterways - dirtying and polluting the water even it doesn't pour out of a pipe at a refinery or pulp mill. TMDL, or total maximum daily load is a way of measuring contamination from all sources, and checking to see if it is more than the waterway can tolerate. The American Farm Bureau has filed a lawsuit on behalf of a couple who own forested land in Mendicino County in the watershed of the Garcia river, where a TMDL protects a fishery from improper logging and associated road building. The lawsuit seeks a blanket order that TMDLs can only apply to point sources. An exception has already been obtained for agriculture, impacting the Mississipppi River drainage resulting in agricultural chemicals washing into the Gulf of Mexico.
  • June 17 1999 UNAIDS HIV/AIDS: Global Overview The number of people with HIV has grown 10% since the end of 1997. 95% of all deaths to date from AIDS occurred in developing countries. 1.2 million children are infected with HIV. 70% of the cases are in Sub-Saharan Africa. 20 - 26% of people aged 15-49 in Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland and Zimbabwe are living with HIV or AIDS. and in Zimbabwe, 20-50 percent of all pregnant women may be infected. Go here for a report on HIV/AIDS in South Africa
  • May 30 1999 The Washington Post As Temperatures Rise The Kyoto agreement is "deader than a Costa Rican golden toad." (threatened by global warming) Rep. Joseph Knollenberg, from Detroit, sponsored a rider that effectively bans federal spending to curb greenhouse gas emissions. In Fairbanks, the number of 40-below days has been halved what it was the 1950s. The permafrost is warming, the sea ice is shrinking in the Bering Sea by 5 percent over 40 years. One species of sea lion declined by 50-80% in just two years. The Inuk name for October refers to the hardening of the ice in Alaskan rivers but this hasn't happened in October in recent years. Sockeye salmon could disappear from the Pacific by the middle of the next century. Last year's catch of sockeye salmon in Bristol Bay was the lowest in over 20 years. Information assembled by Adam Markham, the director of energy and climate policy for the World Wildlife Fund.
  • June 17 1999 Xinhua China Stresses Acid Rain Control While the volume of sulphur dioxide, smog and industrial dust released last year dropped by 7.8%, 7.7% and 12.2% respectively, 30% of China's total land area suffered from acid rain from smog and dust pollution. Mines producing coal with sulphur content are to blame.
  • June 17 1999 Xinhua Pollution Endangers Future of Humanity Falling human semen quality and falling fertility leading to extinction of species like certain amphibians, fishes and birds has been attributed to pollution which is worse in cities and industrialized zones, according to research conducted by the State Family Planning Commission of China, which is in charge of population control and improvement of reproductive health.
  • June 16 Xinhua Combat Desertification says UNEP Chief While ozone depletion, extinction of biodiversity, climate change and loss of soil fertility impact disproportionately on the poor, degradation of a or soil erosion on farmland or the progressive shortening of fallow, directly affects the poor because they affect household food security. Fragile dry lands are overused because limited resources are available.
  • June 16 CNN Fight Urban Sprawl, Boost Bottom Line Employers have become interested in pumping life into a city's "downtown," and have learned that traffic jams, air pollution and a lack of open space will drive away a company's best employees, according to a study by the National Association of Local Government Environmental Professionals. Executives are now participating in planning to promote growth boundaries, build mass transit and spend more money on downtowns. They consider locating business near mass transit. But consumers, while they are worried about traffic congestion, air pollution and loss of open space, still want a dream house, a big yard and a two-car garage. But sprawl contiunes. For example, the average commute by car in Atlanta is 37 minutes, and is expected to be 45 minutes in 20 years.
  • June 14 Africa News Service Population Growth Poses Poverty Challenge in Malawi "The condition of poverty is characterised by the lack of productive means to fulfil basic needs such as food, water, shelter, education and health," and official said. A report compiled recently by the Malawi government and UN agencies said that "Malawi’s single major natural resource, agricultural land, is under severe pressure from rapid population growth." In 1964 there were only about four million people. By mid-1992, it was nine million. Excluding the refugee population of about one million Mozambican refugees, the annual growth rate was about 3.3% from 1977 and 1987. The total fertility rate was about 7.6 births per woman, but has now declined 6.7 births per woman as a result of improved access to health care services. AIDS, worst case scenario, is expected to slow population growth to 2.1 percent per annum by the year 2000, but "If the annual population growth remains at 3.3 percent, the population will double within the next 21 years,"
  • June 14 AP Asia May Face Food Crises after 2000
  • June 14 ENN Credit Card Center Gets 'Charged' by Fuel Cell Four ONSI fuel cells have been installed and will be the primary power source for the First National Bank of Omaha's new 200,000-square-foot Technology Center, housing its computers and data processing.
  • June 12 Xinua Vietnam Makes Efforts to Protect Tigers Only 200 currently survive in Vietnam's mountains and forests, their thinning ranks attributed to poor ecological conditions and illegal poaching.
  • June 12 Star Tribune Trust women - even rape victims - to make childbearing decisions;Bishop should acknowledge complexity of choice in Kosovo . Pope John Paul told Bosnian Muslim women who had been raped at Kosovo to turn their rape into an act of love by "accepting" the enemy into them and making him "flesh of their own flesh" by carrying their pregnancies to term.
  • June 9 InterPress Service Malawi: Curio Trade Endangering Hardwood Forests Carvers making everything from chess sets to safari chairs wonder what they will do when the supply of trees dwindle. Malawi loses up to 50,000 hectares of trees a year. 26,428,000 hectares currently make up the Malawi's forests. Reforestation efforts are not sustainable. It takes 50 to 100 years for the hardwood trees to mature. Alternative ways of making a living are being explored, including breeding guinea fowl, mat-making, and distillation of baobab juice.
  • June 8 WWF Experts Report Widespread Global Warming Impacts on World Oceans. Species affected include plankton, polar bears, whales, walruses, seals, sea lions, penguins, various seabird species and coral reefs. Ocean tempuratures have risen 3 degrees in some places over the past 60 years. Warming has melted ice shelves that house species including algae, plankton and crustaceans, cutting the food supply to larger animals.
  • June 10 Reuters Pakistan Says Population Growth Rate Declining. Pakistan has a population of 135 million. It's annual growth rate of 2.3%, down from 2.4% in the year from mid-1998. In 1972-73 it was 3.7%
  • June 9 1999 Sacramento Bee Study: Air Quality Poor Inside Cars According to a study by the California Air Resources Board, concentrations of some pollutants and toxic compounds may be 10 times higher inside than outside a commuter vehicle in heavy traffic. Sacramento and Los Angeles were locations of the $440,000 study. Such toxics included benzene, formaldehyde, toluene, xylene and MTBE, heavy metals, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. About half the pollutants were emitted from the vehicle ahead. Air conditioners don't help.
  • June 9 1999 US. Newswire Gray Whale Population May Be at Ocean's Limit. While the population of gray whales has gone up to 26,000, increasing numbers are turning up dead or dying on beaches from Mexico to Alaska. Are the whales exceeding the ocean's "carrying capacity"? At Puget Sound in Seattle, the numbers of dead beached whales have gone from three last year to 18 so far this year. (See related May 20 and May 21 ENN articles)
  • June 9 1999 US. Newswire Half of Philippines' 348 Major Rivers Polluted from discharges from factories, residences and mine tailings.
  • June 9 1999 US. Newswire Planned Parenthood Urges Congress to Make Contraceptive Coverage a Reality this Year - this should be the year that the EPICC (the Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage Act) becomes law. 75% of Americans, including 56% of Republicans and 57% of "pro-life" voters support contraceptive coverage.
  • June 9 1999 Reuters Iranian, Vietnam Body, Share U.N. Population Award The U.N. Population Award of $25,000 (each) went to Iran's former Health Minister, Dr. Seyed Alireza Marandi, for convincing the government that family planning was not in conflict with Islamic teaching, and The Vietnam National Committee, which formulates population policy and has helped reduce infant mortality and fertility rates.
  • June 9 1999 Reuters Wildlife Main Casualty on Border between China and India In Sikkim, landmines, barbed wire and bullets from armies on both sides have left only 50 "shapi," said to be the fossil ancestor of both the sheep and the deer. The red panda and red fox are also endangered.
  • June 9 1999 PRNewswire Fuel Cell Ordered by Hospital; for Reliable Power, Virtually Pollution Free Fuel cells are coming of age. A hospital in Rhode Island, USA is using fuel cell for electricity. A fuel cell is similar to a battery. It converts chemical energy from natural gas into electricity and hot water. Each ONSI brand PC25 fuel cell generates 200 kilowatts of electricity (enough for nearly 150 homes), and more than 700,000 Btu per hour of usable heat. The fuel cell does not burn gas, and thus operates virtually pollution free, without emissions associated with acid rain, smog and global warming. More than 100 ONSI fuel cells are in operation around the world.

  • June 8 1999 NYT Mexico's Family Planning Program Successful According to an article on the front page of the New York Times: The country's fertility rate has dropped from 7 children in 1965, to 2.5 today. These smaller families are having a clear effect on the strength of Mexico's economy: with fewer dependents, Mexicans are able to build up savings as well as spend money on consumer goods. This is in direct contrast to the ecoomists who argue that economic development reduces family size; clearly, smaller families drive economic development. For 25 years the jingle "Small families live better" has been heard on television. Due to population momentum, when a high number of women are of childbearing age, the population will continue to grow by about 1 million a year until 2045 when it should stop. Unemployment will remain high, because the economy cannot provide jobs for 1.3 million new workers each year. Due to joblessness, 3.5 million Mexicans are expected, in the next 10 years, to travel to the United States for work. If you would like the Times to print more articles like this, send a letter to the editor: Letters to the Editor, The New York Times, 229 West 43rd Street, New York, NY 10036, fax: (212) 556-3622, e-mail: letters@nytimes.com
  • June 6 1999 Philadelphia Inquirer Ospreys in Trouble?. Biologists are "alarmed" at recent declines in the osprey population along the Atlantic Coast. The average number of offspring per nest has declined from 1.5 to 0.6, and many birds are being found emaciated. Biologists say the bird is an indicator of the health of the coastal ecosystem. Toxins in water supplies, pesticide spraying in the bird's winter habitat in South America, and human encroachment are all likely causes.
  • June 9 1999 Nature Global Warming Could Cause a Complete Shutdown of the Atlantic Labrador Sea Convection. Would have serious consequences for climate in Europe.
  • June 9 1999 Nature Quarter degree Rise in Temperature Since the 1940s Seems to be Due Mainly to Increases in Greenhouse Gases. Offset by cooling effects of sulphate aerosols.
  • June 9 1999 Reuters Bill Gates Gives $20 million for Population Growth and Reproductive Health to John Hopkins University. The University will create the Bill and Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health, which will build the capacity in Latin America, Africa and Asia for them to "handle their own population and reproductive health issues themselves". Global population is growing at by 100 million people each year, and is expected to reach nearly 9 billion by the middle of the 21st century. 100 million women want to fewer children but have no access to contraception.
  • June 9 1999 Adbusters Is Economic Progress Killing the Planet?. When the seven most powerful heads of state meet at the G-7 Summit in Köln, Germany this June 18-20, there will plenty of them to talk about. Culture Jammers will make sure that they talk about the important stuff: Like the rising global temperatures, ozone depletion and extreme weather phenomena that suggest a major climate change is underway. Like the document signed by 1,500 scientists and half of all living Nobel prize winners warning that humankind is proceeding down an unprecedented and catastrophic path by destroying the life-support systems of the planet.
  • June 9 1999 NYT Portland, Model of Smart Growth, asks Intel to Cool It with the Jobs Intel, the computer-chip maker has agreed to pay a "growth impact fee" if it exceeds 1,000 new manufacturing jobs over the 4,000 jobs it already provides. County officials don't want a major expansion that would impact schools, roads, and other infrastructure. In Washington County, 90% of the population of 400,000 people live on 15% of the land, inside the urban growth boundary. Outside of this boundary are farms, forests, orchards and other undeveloped space.
  • June 7 1999 Xinhua Scientists Warn Against Plant Extinction. A special extract in the Yunnan Yew offers an effective cure for cancer, but only 100-odd Yunnan Yew exist today. The world loses at least one plant species a day, and will lose 50,000- 60,000 species by the end of this century. In China, 4,000 of 30,000 plant species are threatened by extinction, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.
  • June 7 1999 PR Newswire High Ozone Levels Harmful to Respiratory System. Ground level ozone, which occurs when pollutants react chemically in the presence of sunlight can cause irritation of the respiratory system causing coughing and irritation in the throat and chest and a reduction in lung function, making breathing shallow and labored, and is particularly hard on asthmatics. Ozone levels increase where there is automobile traffic, heat inversions , and in sunny locations.
  • June 7 1999 ENN Had Enough of Y2K? Start Worrying About Y6B. Catchy ZPG program puts posters on 50 Washington DC buses. World population has tripled since 1930.
  • June 6 1999 Xinhua Lake Tanganyika Threatened with Pollution. Sewers are emptied into lake while oil explorations and international transportation are discharging oil deposits into the water and fishing with small mesh nets and explosives is threatening the biodiversity. Lake Tanganyika is shared by four countries: Zambia, Burundi, Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • June 5 1999 Xinhua China Trying to Protect Environment along Yangtze River. The environment of Qinghai, the source of both the Yangtze and Yellow rivers, has deteriorated quickly in the past few years due to the greenhouse effect and man, resulting in desertification of grassland, spreading soil erosion and the silting of the Yangtze and Yellow rivers. This has hindered social and economic development and the lives of people along the middle and lower reaches of the two rivers.
  • June 5 1999 Xinhua Uganda's Environmental Conservation Still Poor. Deforestation, excavation of land for bricks and the increasing population levels might cause irreversible damage. It is a popular belief that environment is only about vegetation.
  • June 4 1999 Reuters U.N. Voices Worry Over on Afghan Deforestation. Old growth forests in Afghanistan are threatened by war-related activity -- including landmines and bombing, as well as timber exporation interests. Forests have shrunk from 3.4% to 2.6% of the total area. 85% of the rural population depends on wood for heating and cooking.
  • June 3 1999 World Watch Institute Grain Prices Drop as China and India Sacrifice Aquifers World grain prices in late 1998 dropped to the lowest level in two decades, partly because of the economic downturn in several East Asian countries, but more fundamentally because of extensive overpumping for irrigation in both China and India, with 1.25 and 1 billion people, respectively. In effect, both countries are expanding food production in the short run by depleting their aquifers, which means they will face sharp cutbacks in irrigation water supplies once the aquifers are depleted.
  • June 3 1999 World Watch Institute Sperm Counts Drop. Among men in the United States, average sperm counts per milliliter of semen have dropped from 120 million in 1940 to just under 50 million in 1998. Counts in the European countries indicate a similar decline. The principal explanation for this is the so-called endocrine disruption hypothesis, namely that chemicals in the environment act as "environmental estrogens." These imitators of this basic female hormone-found in plastics, pesticides, and industrial pollutants-may adversely affect male reproductive functioning, among other things.
  • June 3 1999 ENN Greenhouse Gases Spur Warm, Wet Winters Reported in Nature, climatologists at Columbia University have studied atmospheric wind patterns and concluded that the seven to 10 degree Fahrenheit rise over northern Eurasia and North America during the last 35 years, resulting in warm wet winters, is "quite likely" a result of the increasing amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere
  • June 2 1999 National Audubon Society Legislative Alert: HR 1211 Vote Expected as Soon As Next Week. A vote on funding for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) is expected in the House shortly after members return from the Memorial Day recess (Tues., 6/8).
  • June 1 1999 ENN Forest Conservation and Deforestation Linked A study publlished in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics predicts a loss of 2.5 acres of forest in Asia, South America, Africa and the former Soviet Union for every 50 acres set aside for conservation in North America and Europe.
  • June 1 1999 ENN 1998 Weather Damage Tally Hits $92 Billion. "Off-the-chart year". Record temperature. Damage up a staggaring 53% from the previous record in 1996. From World Watch Institute. 300 million people were driven from their homes by record storms and floods, many from China's Yangtze River valley, Bangladesh and eastern India. This is more people than live in the United States. Hurricanes Georges and Mitch drove people from their homes in the Caribbean and Central America. Economic growth halved in East Asia, Russia and Brazil. International trade dropped 4%.
  • June 3 1999 AP Frustration Sapping Environmental Concern. In a study released by the group Public Agenda for the American Geophysical Union, in 1989, the percentage of Americans who said they worried a great deal about damage to the ozone layer was 51%, and those that worried about global warming was 35%. In 1997, those numbers were 40% and 24%. The percentage of those that worried about water pollution dropped from 72% to 61%. People tend to blame global warming on greed and selfishness and feel that these behaviors cannot be changed.
  • June 2 1999 Xinua American Continent Faces Serious Environmental Problems said a representative of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) at a forum attended by representatives of Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, and Panama. Pollution has caused epidemics, respiratory diseases, and intoxication with deadly substances while agricultural chemicals seriously damaged the soil and affected agricultural workers' health.
  • June 2 1999 Nature Global Warming Due to Hotter Sun? "Almost all observed global warming up to about 1930 can be ascribed to an increase in the brightness of the sun - but only about half of it for 1930-1970 and less than a third since 1970." says Mike Lockwood of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory.
  • June 3 1999 Reuters Indonesia Fires Seen Flaring Again after Dry Spell. In 1997 thick smog from fires from out-of-control agricultural buring in Indonesia, covered Southeast Asia for months, destroying 12 million acres of forest, agricultural land and bush, causing $4.4 billion in damage, and creating health hazards and damaging tourism. However, this time neighbouring Singapore and Malaysia say that La Nina rains will limit the smog season.
  • June 2 1999 ENN Air pollution Fouls Mount Rainier Park - has the "highest average weekly levels of tropospheric ozone measured anywhere in the state." Source is industrial pollutants and exhaust from automobiles from surrounding urban areas. Ozone at lower atmospheric levels can be toxic to both plants and animals.
  • June 2 1999 CNN Japan Approves 'Pill' After Nearly Decade of Debate and four decades after it was made available in many other countries.
  • June 2 1999 Reuters Air Traffic Growing Cause of Global Warming. A report from the U.N. and the World Meteorological Organization warned that aircraft pollution was a growing factor in global warming. Aviation is growing faster than any other transportation sector. By 2050 the "contrails" left by aircraft are predicted to cover half of one percent of the world's skies. The report asked for more stringent aircraft engine emissions regulations. While aircraft account for only 3% of the total effect of fossil fuels on the climate, this number is predicted to grow 4-5 times over the next 50 years.
  • May 1999 ZPG's Y6B Campaign Connects Population to Extinction of Species, Overcrowded Schools, Traffic Congestion, and Global Warming
  • May 31 1999 Scripps U.S.-sized Haze over Indian Ocean May Affect Global Climate. The wintertime haze contains byproducts, including soot and sulfer droplets, from the burning of fossil fuels for industry and transportation. When the haze blows back across China and SE Asia, it combines with monsoon rains and falls to earth as acid rain. Also aerosol emissions have been increasing in Asia, which reflect sunlight, meaning less water will evaporate from the sea producing less rainfall.
  • May 31 1999 Nando Media Doctor at Focal Point of Third World Quniacrine Debate Impressed with the large numbers of people unable to feed themselves in Korea in the 1960s, Doctor Stephan Mumford began a career promoting contraception and population control. He has focused on a female sterilization method using quinacrine hydrochloride, which the FDA and the World Health Organization say has not been adequately tested. It will cost $8 million to test. Quinacrine has been used in humans for 60 years. Each sterilization costs less than a dollar. Quinacrine was banned in India after 20 years of use due to fears expressed by women's groups. No obvious problems have been found in a study by the FHI using a sample of 1,800 Vietnamese women sterilized with the chemical.
  • May 29 1999 Xinhua China Restricts Mining of Eight Mineral Resources
  • May 28 1999 Reuters Mexico Declares Drought Disaster in Nine States Cattle dying of hunger and thirst. In some areas crops are watered with raw sewage. May be the worst drought in history.
  • May 28 1999 InterPress Service Southern Africa: Looming Grain Shortage signaled by this year's incessant rains. Maize yields were reduced by water logging in some parts of Zimbabwe, Malawi, Zambia and Mozambique, while intermittent dry spells in February affected cereal harvests in South Africa, Swaziland and Lesotho.
  • May 28 1999 Xinua Kenya Population Growth Falls Rapidly In 20 years fertility rates have dropped from 8.1 live births per woman in dropped to 4.6. In the same period the nation's annual growth rate has declined from 3.8 percent to an estimated 2.5 percent.
  • May 27 1999 Africa News Service 100 Countries Negotiate Phasing out Pops Representatives met in Nairobi recently to negotiate a treaty by 2000 which may phase out persistent organic pollutants POPs, which are toxic chemicals, one of which is DDT. According to the WWF, DDT causes damage to the "developing brain, hypersensitivity, behavioral abnormalities and reduced neural signal transmission, suppression of the immune system, resulting in slower response to infections".
  • May 26 1999 ENN Development is Bad News for Grizzlies according to the Siera Club, development in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, growing development is threatening potential key grizzly bear habitat. There are less than 1,000 grizzly bears in the lower 48 US states. "Sprawl, logging, oil and gas drilling, off-road vehicle use and roading are destroying grizzly bear habitat acre-by-acre."
  • May 26 1999 PRB Countdown to 7 Billion Population Population Reference Bureau releases its 1999 World Population Data Sheet, which contains demographic indicators such as infant mortality rates and life expectancies for 200 countries. The world population will reach 6 billion later this year. Who will be baby 6 billion? Due date is October 12. It's been only 12 years since five billion was reached. It took 13 years for the billion before that. Some think the seven billion mark could come even more quickly. Scary, isn't it?
  • May 26 1999 BW Healthwire Legislators Clamor for Contraceptive Coverage 28 states are considering 69 bills requiring insurers to provide some form of contraceptive coverage according to pharmaceutical consulting firm Scott-Levin.
  • May 25 1999 ENN Pakistan Sindh Province Faces Water Shortage because the water authority reduced the share of water due to the province as punishment for its opposition to a proposed hydro-electric dam. Impacted are rice, cotton, and sugar crops, cattle raising, fisheries and adequate drinking water.
  • May 25 1999 Xinua Sperm Quality Drops Because of PollutionThe quantity of sperm cells, the amount of sperm and the number of living sperm cells have dropped 10.3%, 18.6% and 10.4% respectively, in a study of 10,000 Chinese men. The areas with a higher level of industrialization recorded the larger drops, due to deteriorating environmental condition there.
  • May 22 1999 Xinua Bangladesh to Set up 13,500 Community Clinics to provide health and family planning services to the rural people.
  • May 23 1999 Teen Childbearing Drops in America's Largest Cities The number of births to teens decreased by 39% in Detroit, 32% in Toledo and St. Louis, and 31% in Washington, DC. - from 1991 to 1996
  • May 23 1999 Straits Times Philippine President Defies Church Ban on Birth Control Rapid population growth (2.3% per year) must be checked. "We do not follow everything they tell us. We have to think about the welfare of the whole population of the Philippines."
  • May 21 1999 Reuters California Bill Ties Land Use to Water Availability A.B. 1219, now in the Local Government Committee of the CA State Assembly awaiting for approval, will require developers to account for sufficient sustainable water supplies.
  • May 21 1999 Reuters Thais Target Olympics with Cabbages and Condoms "Condom King" Meechai Viravadhya is taking his "Cabbages & Condoms" restaurant chain international, with outlets at the Sydney 2000 Olympics. Established 18 years ago to publicise population-control efforts, it is now focasing on an anti-AIDS campaign. "The concept is that condoms are as easily found as vegetables in a village". Cabbages & Condoms restaurants feature all kinds of condom decorations, including floral arrangements made from coloured condoms instead of flowers. A popular dish is "Spicy Condom Salad" made with hot chiles.
  • May 21 1999 Reuters UN Urges Pakistan to Prepare for Ageing Population 29 million of Pakistan's 134 million population are between 10 and 19 years old. When they grow old, they will have fewer people to support them, so they will need skills, education and ability to be more productive members of society. Pakistan's growth rate is 2.4%, down from 3.1% in the late 1980s. It's population is expected to double in 40 years. 5.5 children are being born per household.

    Of course, the American Life League has jumped on this, saying the UNFPA should be banned from devising methods of limiting family size. They haven't figured out that more young people now means more old people later - a vicious cycle where the poor get poorer. And with poverty comes shortened life spans, more infant deaths, more maternal deaths, more deaths due to pollution and famine, so I guess it works out one way or another. Which way do you prefer?

  • May 21 1999 ENN Food Scarce for Ocean Bottom Dwellers A study shows that the ratio of food supply to food demand decreased by almost 50% from 1989 to 1996. This may be due to the increase in surface tempuratures over the same period of time, leading to a decline in zooplankton, which are part of the food chain. Declines in kelp, sea birds, and the catch of commercial pelagic fishes have also been noted.
  • May 20 1999 ENN Gray Whales May be Starving says an Oregon Sea Grant researcher. About 65 whales have washed up on Mexico's Baja Peninsula, in a higher than normal mortality rate. Also suspected are pollution or changes in seawater from a salt-evaporation plant, cyanide in fluorescent dye used by drug narcotics smugglers in airdrops of drugs. Grey whales feed on bottom-dwelling creatures called amphipods (see above article) and fast during their southern migration.
  • May 20 1999 AP Ecologists Urge Mexico to Ban Genetically Engineered Corn  Greenpeace, worried that excessive logging in Mexico or use of pesticides in the United States may be killing Monarch butterflies, have a new worry (see below). Mexico has increasingly imported genetically modified corn for human consumption. Ecologists also say that the transgenic corn could affect varieties of native Mexican corn.
  • May 20 1999 Xinhua Chinese Scientists Say Global Change Study Needed, warning that increased human activities, economic development, and the growing population have caused global warming, ozone layer depletion, soil degeneration, the extinction of animal species, and resource shortages.
  • May 20 1999 ENN Study Questions Safety of Crops Grown to Make Own Pesticide In a study by Cornell University, Monarch butterfly caterpillers that were fed leaves dusted with the pollen of transgenic corn grew smaller and more died, compared to those eating pollen from unaltered corn. The tissues of the plants had been genetically engineered to produce the pesticide Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt, a naturally occuring toxin harmful to some insects used by organic farmers.Click here for more
  • May 19 1999 New York Times Illegal Chinese Immigrants Swamp Hong Kong Population is expected to increase from 6.3 million now to 8.2 million in the next decade, nearly 60% believed to be due to immigration from China.
  • May 19 1999 ENN Coral Bleaching Events Expected to Multiply 1998 bleaching 'unprecedented' in the warmest year on record, according to the US Department of State and the International Society for Reef Studies. Bleaching occurs when corals are physiologically stressed by a rise in temperature. They then lose their symbiotic algae, which provide them with color and nutrition. Coral reefs provide habitat for 25% of all marine species.
  • May 19 1999 Super Model Brings Campaign Against FGM to Lobby for UNFPA Bill Waris Dirie, supermodel, activist, and author of the book, 'Desert Flower,' which tells the horrific story of her experiences with female genital mutilation, spoke at a press conference to urge lawmakers to support House and Senate bills to reinstate the U.S. contribution to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). Apparently Dirie won over House Speaker Richard Dick Armey.
  • May 17 1999 Audubon Supporters Continue to Drum Up Support for UNFPA, Vote Schedule Uncertain
  • May 17 1999 Audubon Equity in Prescriptive Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage (EPICC) Bill to be Introduced Soon
  • May 18 1999 PRN Newswire Americans Fail to Understand Threat of Outdoor Air Pollution In a study by the American Lung Association, 88% of Americans who live in high ozone areas across the nation rate the outdoor air quality as acceptable or better. Even relatively low ozone levels can affect the ability to breathe and may result in the loss of lung function.
  • May 18 1999 PRN Newswire New, Once-A-Month Injectable Contraceptive Shows No Unintended Pregnancies in Clinical Study LUNELLE(TM), under development by Pharmacia & Upjohn was compared to a popular oral contraceptive in a study of 1,103 women. The 782 women taking LUNELLE(TM) reported no unintended pregnancies.
  • May 17 1999 AP Endangered Foxes Killed to Protect Rare Bird Closer to Extinction. Only 13 San Clemente Island loggerhead shrikes are known to exist in the wild. These are threatened by a small island fox protected under the California Endangered Species Act. There are 650 to 700 such foxes left on the island. Special collars to shock the foxes when they get too close to the birds don't seem to work. Trapping them temporarily while the young birds mature may be the answer. However, 15 foxes have been killed, and some sent to zoos.
  • May 14 1999 CNN Court strikes down tough air pollution rules
  • May 14 1999 Xinhua Beijing Drops Age Limit for Having Children.For the past 10 years, women were allowed to have a child after age 24. While this has been dropped, the one child policy is still in effect.
  • May 14 1999 Africa News Service Zambia Warns of Population "Time Bomb" for the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Zambia's vice-president warns that population could double in 25 years, causing a lowering of the standards of living after the outstripping of the limited resources by the population. "an investment rate of 3.1 percent of gross domestic product is required for every population growth rate of 1.0 percent", which is not feasible.
  • May 14 1999 WalMart Refuses to Carry Emergency Contraception Sometimes the only drug store in many small towns, WalMart may be the nation's largest retailer.
  • May 14 1999 Reuters Peru Heads for Zero Population Growth Growth rate now at an annual 1.7 percent. Leaders of the Catholic Church and some feminit groups say that sterilizations have been carried out using coercion and disinformation. President Fujimori said that the method freely is chosen by women visiting the clinics. From 1995 to 1998, 240,000 voluntary tubal ligations were performed.
  • May 13 1999 Reuters UK Says Greenhouse Gas Emissions down Nine Percent between 1990 and 1997. The UK expects to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 20% from 1990 levels by 2010.
  • May 13 1999 Reuters Kazakh Population Keeps Falling Along with Economy in this vast, resource-rich state in the former Soviet Union. The birth rate has fallen from 13 per 1,000 in 1991 to 4.6 per 1,000 last year. 2/3 of the population average about $35 a month income, and suffer low living standards and low employment. Kazakh also suffers a drain on human resources due to emigration - Russians, Ukrainians and Germans returning to their homelands after Kazakhstan's independence in 1991.
  • May 13 1999 ENN No Role Seen for Ethanol, MTBE in Cutting Smog
  • May 13 1999 Inter Press Global Warming Plays Havoc with Himalayan Weather A severe heat wave in Nepal and northern India is causing a drop in water levels in rivers, and power shortages. Forest fires sweep through tinder-dry forests. Glaciers in the Himalayas are rapidly receeding and may disappear altogether by 2035, in the meantime causing flooding and landslides.
  • May 11 1999 Huge Population Gains Expected to Ravage US-Mexico Border According to a study by the Southwest Center for Environmental Research and Policy, the population of US counties and Mexican cities along the border could double by 2020 to 24 million. Texas and Baja, where there are foreign-owned assembly plants, will be affected the most. Serious environmental problems are predicted, included sewage spilling across the border, water shortages, poor air quality, traffic congestion, and contaminated beaches and oceans. NAFTA has brought jobs to the region, but wages have remained low and unemployment high. The poorest region in the US is along the Mexican border.
  • May 10 1999 ENN Ocean Studied for Carbon Dioxide Storage Under cool temperatures and high pressures, deep in the ocean, carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases react with water to form a liquid or a solid ice-like compound called clathrate hydrate. Ocean disposal, while expensive, may be a safe and viable option for deterring the harmful buildup of atmospheric carbon dioxide.
  • May 10 1999 ENN Green Space Fosters Social Ties A simple lawn with a few trees can help in developing social ties and a sense of community in a poor area according to a study from the University of Illinois.
  • May 7 1999 ENN Enzymes Called Key to Low-Sulfur Gasoline Sulphur can be removed from gasoline using enzymes. A biotechnology firm is developing a process to help meet the standards that would allow automobiles to run 80% cleaner. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that this reduction in gasoline sulfur would be equivalent to removing 166 million cars from the road and would take 3 million tons of pollution out of the air. The enzyme technique is expected to cost 1 to 2 cents per gallon of gasoline. The plan is expected to take effect between 2004 and 2006.
  • May 7 1999 ENN WWF Seeks Greater Protection of Fragile Wetlands Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay asked to designate the entire Pantanal, one of the world's largest floodplains, as a protected site. Upcoming is the May 10-18 Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance meeting in Costa Rica. The treaty has been ratified by 114 states, protecting nearly 1,000 ecosystems. Tanzania, Cameroon, Nigeria, Cambodia, Laos and Cuba have not yet joined.
  • May 2 1999 Xinhua Expert Warns Against Deteriorating Forest Ecology A case against excessive logging: A total of 25 million people have been forced to move out of their hometowns due to deteriorating environment, three million more than the world's refugee population. Forests absorb 30% to 40% of the rainwater on the earth. Forests are now 62 percent less than 8,000 years ago. Every ton of timber can absorb 1.47 tons of carbon dioxide and release 1.07 tons of oxygen. Of the 1.4 million species on the earth, about 50 to 90 percent live in a forest.
  • May 3 1999 Africa News Service Malawi-Pollution Urban Rivers Too Polluted for Human Use Discharge of industrial waste, waste products from homes in densely populated areas, and agro-chemical run-off are blamed.
  • May 3 1999 Inter Press Indonesia: Industry Chokes River Habitat In Cimahilir, outside the capital Jakarta, residents used to be able to used to be able to fish in the river, wash in it and use it for recreation. Now rice harvest yields have dropped because of pollution from hundreds of textile factories that flows into the paddy fields.
  • May 11 1999 ENN UN Body Wants "Marshall Plan" to Fight Global Woes. The U.N. Development Program (UNDP), in a new study called Global Public Goods, proposes a new global fund to help poorer countries fight evils such as environmental degradation, narcotics, runaway population growth and terrorism. To be like the U.S. Marshall Plan, which revived Europe after World War II.
  • May 10 1999 Business Wire Discount Internet Contraceptives at www.soma.com. $14 for a one-month supply of birth control pills.
  • May 3 1999 Daily News -Woodland Hills, CA Smart Growth' Ignores Many Harsh Truths: Pretty fixes won't solve problems of rampant U.S. population growth. By B. Meredith Burke. A National Town Meeting for a Sustainable America, sponsored by The President's Council on Sustainable Development, will feature resource-conserving practices of businesses nationwide. As if, with design and technology, the US can support a growing economy and a growing population indefinitely, without a deterioration in the quality of life. Smart Growth "piecemeal solutions" falsely represent a coherent, comprehensive policy that promises to "deliver our land endowment unscathed to generations to come." With incessant population growth, greenbelt boundaries "will result in mini-Manhattans inside" and out-migration (and loss of farmland and wilderness) by persons who want to see blue sky, not high-rises."
  • May 6 1999 PR Newswire Women's Use and Attitudes about Birth Control80% of women who take oral contraceptives would prefer a monthly contraceptive option. The pill is banned in Japan - only 4% of Japanese women have ever used the pill compared to 95% of French women. 97% of Japanese women used male condoms as birth control. 56% of American women used abstinence as a form of birth control at some point. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are used by 31% in France, and by 6% in the US. The withdrawal method is used by 56% in Japan, 47% in Italy, and 40% in the US.
  • May 5 1999 ENN Bangladesh Offered Low-cost Arsenic Remedy Cost may be $2-$5 a year per family. 1.2 million people affected. The process uses direct coprecipitation and iron-oxide based coagulants.
  • May 5 1999 ENN Environmentalists Applaud Conservation Actthat would fund wildlife conservation and related recreation and education programs from a percentage of federal offshore oil and gas revenues.
  • May 2 1999 Reuters U.S. Senators Back U.N. Family Planning ProgramThey hope to restore the $20 million U.S. share of a U.N. program to encourage family planning, slashed last year by congressmen who said the program promoted abortion. Click here for WOA!s background on this.
  • May 2 1999 CNN Clinton: New Rules Can Help Clean Air at Modest Cost Sport utility vehicles targeted. EPA also calls for sale of only low-sulfur gasoline so emission control equipment can work efficiently. Although 97 percent cleaner than they were 30 years ago, automobiles,SUVs and light trucks, account from 1/3 to 1/2 of nitrogen oxide pollution in urban areas and about 22 percent nationwide. They also are major sources of toxic chemicals and microscopic soot in the air.
  • May 2 1999 Reuters Malaysia to Help Indonesia Fight Fires, Smog. Agricultural burning in Indonesia threatens to start another season of polluted skies. Two years ago, such forest fires caused and environmental crisis which drove people indoors, disrupting work and business and severely affecting health and tourism. Malaysia and Singapore have since struck a pact with Indonesia to form an early response system to such fires. Local authorities are trying to crack down on open burning.
  • May 2 1999 Reuters Women's Future Talk of the Town in Saudi Arabia A call by Crown Prince Abdullah for women to contribute fully to society and take part in dialogue over their future marks support of Saudi women. Currently women in Saudi Arabia are barred from driving, don't have identity cards and need written permission from a male relative to travel. The government plans to issue identity cards for women with their photos on them.
  • April 10 1999 World Watch Institute Nations Begin to Experience Demographic Fatigue--a slowdown in population growth due not to smaller families but to increasing death rates. The death rate is increasing due to the HIV epidemic, aquifer depletion, and shrinking cropland area per person. "One third of humanity could slide into a demographic dark hole." Says Lester R. Brown in a new book, Beyond Malthus: Nineteen Dimensions of the Population Challenge. In 1998, the United Nations reduced the projected world population for 2050 from 9.4 billion to 8.9 billion, by 500 million, 2/3 due to falling birth rates and one third the result of rising death rates.
  • Apr 29 1999 AP Teen Birth Rates down in U.S. According to a report from the Health and Human Services, the teen birth rate fell 4% in 1997 and at total of 16% between 1991 and 1997. Out-of-wedlock births declined, 2 percent lower than in 1996. 20% of the decrease since the late 1980s is because of decreased sexual activity, and 80% is because of more effective contraceptive practice.
  • Apr 28 1999 ENN Ozone Layer on Slow Path to Recovery
  • Apr 27 1999 AP Septic Tanks, Farm Runoffs Endanger US WatersMicrobes such as viruses and bacteria pose a greater threat than chemical water pollutants. Culprits include E. coli O157, cryptosporidium, giardia, hepatitis A and pfiesteria, which come from pumping human waste into rivers or oceans, or letting them filter into groundwater, or from cattle lots or chicken farms. From a report by the American Society for Microbiology.
  • April 26 1999 Inter Press Mexico: Battle over Morning After Pill Pro-Vida (Pro-Life) brought a lawsuit against the Mexican Family Planning Foundation (Mexfam) for providing "emergency" contraceptives to adolescents. There are an an estimated 300,000 illegal abortions in Mexico, where abortions are illegal.
  • Apr 26 1999 AP All Abstinence only Programs Lower Teen Pregnancy Rate Others Take the Credit! claims Why Life? (pro-life) director Cathy Brown. "In 1970, Planned Parenthood created a massive explosion in unwed teen pregnancy by selling birth control to kids under the guise that it would protect them from pregnancy and disease. With this false sense of security, unwed teen births ended up tripling the statistics in 1960. By 1990, it had more than quadrupled. Their claim is that birth control pills and devices, all with high rates of failure, are the reason for lower statistics. Virginity is up eleven percent (up 11% from what?) overall and I don't think there's any question that abstinence is more reliable than a condom or birth control pills. "(1.1 percent pregnancy rate among girls in the program vs. 26 percent pregnancy rate among girls city-wide). (There's no mention of how old the girls are in the abstinence program and how many drop out after awhile? And how many actually in the program? Abstinence has it's own failure rate, too. It's called intercourse. According to the Population Institute, 8 in 10 teenage pregnancies pregnancies are unintended. Does that mean that the teenagers used contraceptives which failed or that they intended abstinence and failed? The failure rate on contraceptives is much lower than this article would lead you to believe.)
  • Apr 26 1999 AP Channel Islands' Foxes Face Extinction unless the animals are placed in captivity such as the Calif. condors were. A matter of months or even weeks before these populations disappear. Fox population has dropped 90% in four years due to predators, parasites, malnutrition, and loss of habitat.
  • Apr 23 1999 Xinhua China to Build Ecosphere at Source of Major Rivers Northwest China's Qinghai Province, the source of the Yangtze and Yellow rivers., has seen expanding environmental deterioration in the past 40 years, growing wasteland, thousands of lakes going dry and 100 million tons of sand and mud flowing into the rivers. Grass and forests are to be planted in a program spanning the next 50 years.
  • Apr 23 1999 ENN Most Americans face air cancer risk For 220 million Americans, the air they breathe is 100 times more toxic than the goal set by Congress 10 years ago, and for another 11 million, the cancer risk is 1,000 times higher, according to the Environmental Defense Fund. Cars, trucks and small businesses can take a large part of the blame. The District of Columbia has the highest per-capita air cancer risk with almost no major industrial facilities. Main sources were car and truck traffic and the Ronald Reagan National Airport.
  • Apr 23 1999 PRNewswire Savvy(r) Contraceptive and HIV Preventive Gel in the Works Biosyn, Inc. is testing a contraceptive gel that has also been designed to prevent transmission of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including HIV, chlamydia, and gonorrhea.
  • Apr 23 1999 ENN Bushmeat: Logging's deadly 2nd harvest With the increase of logging roads, the number of wildlife (for example such as elephants, gorillas, antelopes, and chimpanzees) killed and marketed as bushmeat has increased exponentially, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society. In the Congo, hunting is 3-6 times higher near logging roads. In 1996 in the Malaysian state of Sarawak, wild meat trade was estimated to be 1,000 tons a year. Eating primates, once taboo in many tribes, is beginning to be tried as a result of the exposure to the logging camps.
  • Apr 23 1999 Reuters Gene Revolution in Agriculture May Offer Potentially Irreversible Ecological ImpactExotic species cause losses of up to $123 billion per year in the U.S. alone. Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), designed to tolerate herbicides or fight off insects, could mutate or interbreed with other plants and potentially become an invasive species. Suicide seeds could dominate self-reproducing plants, leaving farmers dependent on major agro-chemical and pharmaceutical companies.
  • Apr 22 1999 Chicago Tribune The US: The World's Biggest Deadbeat. Seven former secretaries of state going back to Henry Kissinger have called the U.S. 'the world's biggest deadbeat' because it owes the UN more than $1.6 billion in back payments. If Washington doesn't pay at least $250 million by December, it stands to lose its vote in the General Assembly come Jan. 1, 2000," said the Tribune editorial, "The Shame of a Wealthy Deadbeat." The House of Representatives is engaged in a standoff with President Clinton, who vetoed a UN funding bill because it included language forbidding the use of federal funds by family planning groups promoting abortion abroad. "UN population policy already is that abortion should not be used as a method of family planning. That should be sufficient."
  • Apr 22 1999 Africa News Service African Development Pegged to Usage of Biological Resources Most African countries are suffering from poverty and low literacy levels - the two most important factors that exacerbate environmental degradation and bio-diversity loss. Over 90% of the people use biological resources for food, shelter, medicine (herbal) and income. In a wet regions of Kenya, lush green forest cover has been cleared to pave way for human settlement and food cultivation to feed the growing population. Various animal species are getting increasingly rare due to hunting. Since the 1970s, soil erosion has hit the district hard. Indigenous tree species are fast disappearing and streams are drying up due to deforestation. Animals are facing extinction due to the high rate of exploitation.
  • Apr 21 1999 Xinhua Healthy Economy Equals Healthy Environment The president of Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce said that American businesses have spent more than $1 trillion during the last 30 years to clean up the environment and that Wisconsin has cut air pollutants by 11 percent between 1990 and 1997. According to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, environmental spending on a national level has helped produce: A dramatic decline in all six of the major air pollutants, despite a 121 percent increase in the last two decades in miles traveled by automobile; a 98 percent decline in toxic water pollutants from point sources; an increase in the amount of forestland - three times the amount as there was in 1920; a net gain of 69,000 acres of wetlands in 1995; over 95 $ of the nation’s rivers, lakes, and streams maintained or improved their water quality between 1972 and 1992; energy efficiency in manufacturing has improved by 1% to 2% per year. (Hard to believe - can anyone verify or disprove?)
  • Apr 21 1999 Xinhua Desertification in Chinese Northwest due to arid weather and ecological degradation - excessive farming, logging, grazing, and the use of water. Deserts account for about 34%of its land.
  • Apr 21 1999 AP Abandonment of Baby Girls Increasing Rapidly in China Urban Chinese are limited to one child per family, but most rural residents may have a second child if their first is a girl. Failing that, families may abandon daughters so that they can try again for a son.
  • Apr 20 1999 Reuters Contraceptives Fail in 9-12 Percent of Women per year, according to the Alan Guttmacher Institute and a team at Princeton University The implant and injectables have the lowest failure rates (2 to 3 %), followed by the pill (8%), the diaphragm and cervical cap (12%), the male condom (14%), periodic abstinence (21%), withdrawal (24%) and spermicides (26%). Over a lifetime use of contraceptives, women on average have 1.8 accidental pregnancies and 48% of all pregnancies in the United States are unintended.
  • Apr 20 1999 IPS New Plan to Save World's Forests The World Commission on Forests and Sustainable Development, formed after the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992, has suggested several new ways to measure the economic value of unexploited forests and new mechanisms to help monitor the global threat to forests. Since the Commission was formed, more than 90 million hectares of forest have disappeared and in 25 countries, forests have virtually disappeared. Since 1950 nearly 75% of tropical forests in west Africa are gone and Nigeria, Kenya, Burundi, Cote D'Ivoire and Madagascar -- lost more than 90 percent of their original forest Thailand has lost a third of its forests in the 1980's. Latin America and the Caribbean lost 9.7% of its forest area from 1980 and 1995. Countries with prominent forest cover would be included -- as would countries that are major importers and exporters of wood products -- including the United States, Brazil, Japan, and India. The Commission is suggesting the development of a concept called the Forest Capital Index, designed after the U.N. Human Development Index, which would provide a uniform numerical indicator of the state of a country's forest. Prices on wood products should reflect the ecological benefits of forests lost when trees are logged. The commission suggested establishing an international Forest Ombudsman to act as an independent watchdog on exploitation and environmental abuses. The report suggests the Ombudsman work closely with Global Forest Watch, a network sponsored by World Resources Institute.
  • Apr 19 1999 Itar-Tass UN Warns of Grave Ecological Fallout from NATO Air Raids. Concerns are that leakages and discharges from destroyed oil-processing as well as chemical pharmaceutical factories can runoffs into and pollute the Danube and later pollute soil and underground waters. Oil fires result in benzopyrene, a dangerous carcinogenic substance. The the Russian Hydrometeorological Committee calculated that such discharges have reached Byelorussia, Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine.
  • Apr 19 1999 CNN Environmental Issues Cloud China's Future In Shanghai, 67% of the city's air is breathable and that the rest is contaminated with arsenic, lead and mercury, elements found in coal. Waterways are polluted because of dumping of sewage and industrial waste.
  • Apr 16 1999 Reuters SE Asia Vows to Fight Dry Season Smog The 1997 smog, mostly from fires in Indonesia, plagued SE Asia for months, pushing air pollution levels to unhealthy levels and affecting tourism. Officials of Brunei, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam (soon to be admitted is Cambodia) agreed to adopt a policy of zero-burning for plantation owners and timber companies particularly in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. Analysts worried if Indonesia, with its economic and political crisis, has the infrastructure or ability to deal with fires.
  • Apr 16 1999 Reuters 16,000 Airplanes Daily Polluting Planet. At a meteorologist conference in Costa Rica, the secretary of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said that airplanes have become one of the main sources of atmospheric pollution and emitters greenhouse gases.
  • Apr 15 1999 UN Vatican Criticism of UNFPA Relief Effort Shows Insensitivity to Kosovar Women's Suffering, UN Population Fund director Nafis Sadik said. "I am surprised and disappointed by the Vatican's statement condemning the provision of emergency contraception to Kosovo refugees. It shows an insensitivity to the suffering of the women of Kosovo. "The United Nations Population Fund, working with other UN agencies and non-governmental organizations, has sent emergency reproductive health kits, including equipment for safe deliveries and emergency contraceptives for rape victims, to Albania to help Kosovo refugees.
  • Apr 15 1999 Reuters Greenpeace says Australia's Greenhouse Emissions Could Rise 70% by 2014 Estimates of greenhouse emissions from the burning of oil, coal and gas disputed by Australia.
  • Apr 15 1999 AP El Niño May Slow Global Warming From 1991 to 1994 -- years when El Niño warmed the Pacific -- the ocean released 30 - 80% less carbon dioxide, a gas that is believed to trap heat in the atmosphere. Article is from the journal Nature. (Compare to the following story)
  • Apr 15 1999 Xinua UNEP Meets on Sustainable Development The Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD), which begins April 19 in New York, will discuss sustainable tourism, ocean issues, sustainable production and consumption, small island issues and biodiversity. Over 40% of the globe's coral reefs have been hit by severe bleaching n the past 14 months perhaps due to El Niño or global warming.
  • Apr 15 1999 ENN Consumer Impacts on Environment Ranked From the Union of Concerned Scientists: Some consumer decisions are insignificant, like the choice between paper or plastic grocery bags. Cars and light trucks cause the most environmental damage overall, causing almost half of the toxic air pollution and over 1/4 of the greenhouse gases traceable to household consumption. Cutting meat consumption, particularly red meat, by half would reduce food-related land use by 30% and common water pollution by 24%. It is also important to choose carefully when buying a home so that it is near public transportation, reducing the need to drive, and has efficient lighting, heating and cooling. The Green Web Game shows how consumer choices rank environmentally.
  • Apr 15 1999 PRN Stopp Tells Students 'Plan for Larger Families' Stop Planned Parenthood International says that 26 years of legalized abortion has taken a minimum of 38 million people out of the work force." causing the Social Security system, Medicare and health care costs are all out of control. (We need more and more young people to take care of more and more old people. Then when they get old, we'll need even more young people to take care of those old people. This assumes that there is no limit to the earth's carrying capacity. And I guess they haven't noticed that it's starting to get a little crowded.)
  • Apr 14 1999 PAI House Committee Takes First Step toward Refunding UN Population Fund The International Relations Committee adopted an amendment to restore a U.S. contribution to the UNFPA during the committee's consideration of the State Department authorization bill H.R. 1211. Population Action International president Amy Coen said "There is well-founded concern about China's family planning program, not UNFPA's. Congress should not hold voluntary family planning efforts and UNFPA hostage to a legitimate concern about the conduct of the Chinese government. The Fund is committed to freedom of individual choice in family planning, opposes coercion in any form, and is working to this end in China."
  • Apr 13 1999 ENN DOE Begins Push to Capture CO2 - Issuing a report on the science and technology of carbon sequestration - the capture and secure storage of carbon dioxide emitted from the combustion of fossil fuels. The Dept. of Energy report is seen as a starting point to find a safe, predictable and affordable way to prevent carbon dioxide from building up in the atmosphere.
  • Apr 12 1999 ENS UN Environment & Population Agencies Link Up The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) have linked together for the attainment of sustainable development. With the global population forecast to hit six billion by October, there is continued stress on the planet's carrying capacity from unsustainable consumption patterns, rural-urban migration and rapid urbanization.
  • Apr 12 1999 PRNewswire California State Senate Approves Bill to Require Private Insurers Cover Birth Control Prescriptions. Next stop: the Assembly.
  • Apr 12 1999 AP Congress Embracing Land Conservation with Gusto - as much as $2.6 billion a year under one proposal, exceeding the $1.1 billion "land legacy" initiative proposed by President Clinton in February. Local and state ballot initiatives approved by voters in November called for spending more than $4 billion on urban parks and setting aside farmland and open spaces.
  • Apr 12 1999 ENN Lower Snake River Named Most Endangered in the United States today by American Rivers. Dams on the lower Snake River have brought salmon and steelhead to the brink of extinction, reducing fish populations by 90%. We need to see the devastating impacts of unplanned, rapid growth (sprawl) on rivers or the hardships that communities face from a wholesale degradation of rivers across the country.
  • Apr 12 1999 AP Southern California School Woes Due to Limited English Proficiency From a report by the Southern California Association of Governments, the number of students with limited English Proficiency grew from 19% to 30% during the last 10 years, largely because of immigration from Mexico and Latin America. 33% of students fail to graduate from high school. Part of the problem is that California ranks 41st in the nation in per-pupil spending while ranking 9th in teacher's salaries due to higher cost of living. Traffic congestion also got low grades in the report.
  • Apr 11 1999 NY Times New strategy for limiting world population growth by improving the status of women is now facing serious religious, ideological, and financial difficulties. Countries seeking to "water down commitments made in Cairo." are nations with extremist religious factions, including Catholic and Islamic fundamentalists: Argentina, Guatemala, Nicaragua and the Vatican; Algeria, Libya, Malta, and Sudan.
  • Apr 11 1999 Xinhua Shanghai Reports 7 Years' Negative Population Growth Shanghai has 14.64 million permanent residents, 7 million fewer than in 1963 when the family-planning policy was introduced. . Birthrates were 5.2 per 1000 in 1998. The reduced rate has been attributed partly to rising per capita GNP, which in 1998 is equal to 3,400 US dollars.
  • Apr 11 1999 WWI Rising Mortaility Joins Falling Fertility To Slow Population Growth For the first time since China's great famine claimed 30 million lives in 1959-61, rising death rates are slowing world population growth. The UN has reduced projections for 2050 from 9.4 billion to 8.9 billion people, about 2/3 of the drop due to because of falling birth rates, and 1/3 is the result of rising death rates. Many African countries expected to lose one fifth or more of their adult population to AIDS within the next decade. In Botswana, life expectancy has fallen from 62 years in 1990 to 44 years in 1998. In Zimbabwe, it has fallen from 61 years in 1993 to 49 years in 2000. Water shortage is another problem. In India water withdrawals double the rate of aquifer recharge and water tables are falling by 1 to 3 meters per year over much of the country. Such shortages could drop India's grain harvest by one fourth.
  • Apr 10 1999 Xinhua Wild Siberian Tiger Population Down to 20 China. Down from 80 in the 1980s.
  • April 10 1999 World Watch Institute Drive Seeks to Get U.N. Funding Approved on Hill Without Strings The Better World Campaign, a small Washington organization established with money from media tycoon Ted Turner is lobbying to persuade Congress to pay this country's $1 - 1.5 billion debt to the world organization. More than half of the debt is for peacekeeping activities. But the sticking point is over the funds that would be spent on global family planning. The Better World Campaign will attempt to persuade Congress to enact legislation authorizing release of funds already appropriated without attaching an antiabortion rider sponsored by Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.).
  • Apr 9 1999 ENN Melting of Antarctic Ice Shelves Accelerates. The melt season has increased by 2-3 weeks over the last 20 years. Antarctica, the fifth largest continent, contains about 90 % of the world's glacial ice.
  • Apr 8 1999 ENN Oil Giant to Plant Trees, Fight Warming. Mobil Oil partners with American Forests (Global ReLeaf Forests) by funding the planting of 500,000 trees in the U.S. and funding support for forest conservation studies being conducted by The Nature Conservancy in Peru and Conservation International in Indonesia.
  • Apr 8 1999 AP Amazon Rain Forest Fading Faster than Expected -Is being destroyed twice as fast as previously believed. Satellite images were missing damage due to logging and forest fires. Lost is now estimated to be 17,000 square miles for last year, or 3 times the official Brazilian estimate of 5,700.
  • Apr 7 1999 IPS Human Life International Charges US and Canada "Contraceptive Imperialism" "There is no overpopulation crisis anywhere in the world." "Contraceptives are the stepping stone for abortion". "Use of contraceptives often leads to divorce." Says the Pill, Norplant, and Depo-Provera cause non-surgical abortions. "There are actually between 300 and 1000 abortions per minute globally." (This is hard to believe since the net world growth rate is about 2.8 per second, or 170 per minute! We'd be standing on each others' heads if this was true and people stopped using contraceptives!)
  • Apr 6 1999 IPS Mexico: Gray Whales Face New Threat due to dumping of toxic brine in a salt extration process. Of 20,000 whales arriving in the San Ignacio and Ojo de Liebre lagoon area, 540 whales are predicted to die according to Greenpeace.
  • Apr 5 1999 AP Carbon Dioxide Threatens Tropical Coral Reefs. Excess carbon in the atmosphere can dissolve in the ocean and disrupt complex chemical reactions that the coral uses to build its reef colonies. Coral reefs are also threatened by human activities such as destructive fishing practices, coastal development, overexploitation of marine resources, marine pollution and sedimentation from inland deforestation and farming.
  • Apr 5 1999 ENN New Census Bureau Report: World Population Continues to Grow - will increase to 8 billion by the end of 2026.96% of world population growth occurs in the developing regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. For the full report, click here.
  • Apr 5 1999 IPS Sex Study Springs "Withdrawal" Surprise in Pakistan Many Pakistani men are communicating and cooperating with their wives to jointly decide family size, and protect the wives' health. Withdrawal is practiced by as many as one in five couples using family planning, research shows. About 18 % of married women of child-bearing age rely on contraception - they are worried about side effects. While failure rate is high compared to modern contraceptives, withdrawal is only slightly less effective than condoms.
  • Apr 5 1999 Reuters New Theories about Oil Spill's Harm A study shows that oil is 100 times more toxic to developing fish and that oil pollutants linger years longer than previously believed.
  • April 4, 1999 AP North Koreans Flee to China in desparate search for food Since devastating floods and drought in 1995, 1996, and 1997, North Korean's population has fallen from 25 million to 22 million, with 2 million dying due to starvation or hunger-related diseases. Children are stunted by malnourishment. "It's a 'slow famine'. said a World Food Program spokesman. Aid workers report seeing people executed for cannibalism.
  • April 2, 1999 Gorillas, Rhinos under Threat in Heart of Africa Killing of eight tourists have threatened to cut off funds needed for conservation. Only 620 gorillas survive in the wild. Poachers, rebel troops or crossfire have killed around 10 gorillas, another reported to have stepped on a landmine. Only 25 northern white rhinos survive.
  • April 2, 1999 Census Bureau Says World Population to Reach 8 Billion by 2026 and 9.3 billion by 2050. While the rate of increase is slowing, in absolute terms world population growth continues to be substantial. 96% of world population increase now occurs in the developing regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America.
  • April 1, 1999 ENN Dams Lethal to Salmon, Environmental Groups Claim in Suit Dams on the Lower Snake River are causing river conditions lethal to salmon and steelhead populations and resulting in water contaminated with high levels of nitrogen gas, violating the Clean Water Act.
  • March 1999 Emagazine The Last of Their Kind.  As the War on Wildlife Continues, We're Losing Species at an Incredible Rate. The top 10 in trouble are: the Giant Panda, the Asian Tiger, Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle, Black-Footed Ferret, Karner Blue Butterfly, Northern Right Whale, Orangutan, Roseate Tern, Florida Panther, and Black Rhinoceros.
  • March 31, 1999 ENN Urban Sprawl Not a Threat, National Center for Policy Analysis claims Now that we finally have the $9.5 billion program Better America Bonds to control urban sprawl and the $1 billion Lands Legacy Initiative to preserve natural places, the National Center for Policy Analysis claims that suburbanization does not threaten the quality of life and advocates managing land development through real-estate markets rather than comprehensive land-use planning. Forested lands, wetlands, open space, and farmlands are threatened claims conservationist groups. (You know ... like developers actually take into account school locations, closeness of stores and work, traffic, availability of water, parks, bikeways, etc. when they plan a development, without even having their arm twisted. Gosh, we don't need planning departments or zoning - the developers know what's right.)
  • March 1999 Emagazine Clouds Over the Coral.  The Florida Keys coral reefs are in desparate trouble.
  • March 29, 1999 ENN Global warming may increase ozone hole While the lower atmosphere it is heated, climate changes may cause colder ozone-layer air, causing more polar stratospheric clouds, which would lead to the removal of trace gases that normally deactivate ozone-destroying chlorine.
  • March 29, 1999 ENN Arsenic levels in drinking water too high, study finds, increasing risks of cancer. Up to 2,200 of the 56,000 U.S. water supply systems (mostly water in wells) may be affected. Arsnic is added to the environment by weathering of rocks, burning of fossil fuels, smelting of ores and manufacturing.
  • Mar 30 1999 Inter Press Service Group Seeks Review of Quinacrine Sterilization Drug. Population Institute, a group advocating population stabilization, wants further testing of the sterilization drug quinacrine. If given a clean bill of health, quinacrine would provide a low-cost, non-surgical sterilization method. However, quinacrine sterilizations are banned in the U.S and there is some evidence of carcinogens. To accomplish sterilization, pellets of quinacrine are inserted into the uterus near the fallopian tubes, burning and scaring the tubes' lining, creating a blockage that prevents pregnancy. 3 million U.S. servicemen took quinacrine for malaria and other parasitic disease prevention, and, after 50 years, no clusters of cancer have been attributed to quinacrine. Contraceptive use is now estimated at 70% in developed countries and about 55% in developing countries.
  • Mar 30 1999 AP Anti-Abortion Groups Demand Inclusions in U.N. Agreement. Already no U.S. funds may be spent for "a population program that is not voluntary." But the anti-abortion coalition, including The Vatican, Guatemala, and the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute, wants the congressional language to be included that would allow countries to opt out of family planning programs and still receive development assistance.
  • Mar 29 1999 Xinhua Australia's Population Grows to 18.8 Million due to a 30-percent increase in migration even though the birth rate has decreased.
  • Mar 29 1999 Africa News Service Kenya-Humans Blamed for Greenhouse Gas Increase, could result in increased heatwave, water shortage, and increased disease, such as malaria. Extensive cutting of trees for settlement and farming has turned productive areas into water-stressed lands. Increase in use of fertilisers and pesticides has led to health-related problems.
  • Mar 28 1999 AP Fuel Cells Could Change Way America Lights Homes. Small electrochemical generators now used to run spacecraft are a non-polluting source of power for both electrcity and vehicle power. Technology is advancing and the price is coming down. Will help California's year 2003 standard for zero emission for 10 percent of cars sold. Fuel celled electricity could be 140 million homes by 2030. For related stories - click here
  • Mar 27 1999 AP Prickly Times For Rockfish Populations off the Washington, Oregon and California coast. Counts of 71 species of rockfish have dropped 90% in 30 years. From a Pacific Marine Conservation Council Report. Rockfish account for 40% of all commercial take on the West Coast.
  • Mar 26 1999 WWI Destructive Storms Drive Insurance Losses Up $91.8 billion in losses from weather-related natural disasters in the 1990s so far, have amounted to nearly four times the amount for the 1980s. Six of the ten warmest years on record have occurred since 1990. This is best viewed graphically.
  • Mar 26 1999 Reuters The Vermont House of Representatives on contraceptive coverage The House gave preliminary approval to legislation that would require health insurance plans to include contraceptive prescriptions.
  • Mar 26 1999 US Newswire Scientists Call on Congress to Strengthen the Clean Water Act to Protect Coastal and Marine Habitats. The Center for Marine Conservation (CMC) and 320 scientific leaders say that pollutants carried by our nation's waterways into coastal waters, including excess nitrogen and phosphorous pollution, nutrients, animal waste, and fertilizers are increasing fish kills, harmful algae blooms, and dead zones. Many are from unregulated ources such as are municipal wastewater, industrial discharges and farms runoff.
  • Mar 26 1999 Africa News Service Population De-Growth Key to Zimbabwe's Future. The objectives in Bob Stumbles' book "The Three Golden Keys": Human Population De-growth, Economic Growth and Environmental Re-growth are vital for success in developing nations. When population growth outstrips a nations' economic growth, poverty grows like an weed and brings with it "chronic suffering and hardship". Zimbabwe is unable to meet the subsistence needs of its current population, let alone a growing one.
  • Mar 25 1999 WWI Turning the Tide to Save Oceans. Citizen groups, businesses, and governments are mobilizing to save the oceans before human activities destroy them, reports Senior Researcher Anne Platt McGinn in a new study, Safeguarding the Health of Oceans. Seven out of 10 commercial fish species are fully or overexploited. As a result of habitat degradation, insured coastal property damages in the U.S. soared to $50 billion in the 1990s. The number of poisonous algal species identified by scientists has nearly tripled since 1984, increasing fish kills, beach closures, and economic losses. About 2 billion people live within 100 kilometers of a coastline. The number of countries that have ratified The Law of the Sea since it was established has doubled to 130. Known as the "Constitution of the Oceans", the Law of the Sea provides a comprehensive framework for ocean protection. The United States is one of only eight countries worldwide that still has not ratified it.
  • Mar 25 1999 Africa News Service Family Planning Needs Not Fully Met In Kenya, over 70% cent of married women do not use family planning methods even though they do not want any more children or want to space births.
  • Mar 24 1999 AP Environmental Groups Opposing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Bill, fearing the bill would allow credits for emissions not verified. "The bill rewards our biggest polluting companies even if they make no changes whatsoever," said John Passacantando, Executive Director of Ozone Action. He challenged Senators to avoid taking the "Band-Aid" approach to global warming in S.547, the "Credit for Voluntary Reductions Act," and instead provide incentives for U.S. industries to lead the way on energy efficiency and pollution prevention technologies. Other groups opposed are the Sierra Club, Greenpeace, Natural Resources Defense Council, World Wildlife Fund, and the National Environmental Trust.
  • Mar 24 1999 AP Support for U.N. Family Planning Agency. Family planning has gone from 15% to 60% in the 30 years since the UNFPA (U.N. Population Fund) started. It now provides services to 160 countries. $25 million for fiscal 2000 is requested by Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. Without the funding 870,000 women will be deprived of modern contraception, "leading to 500,000 unintended pregnancies, 234,000 births, 200,000 abortions and thousands of maternal and child deaths," she said in a news conference Tuesday. (Abortions are reduced by making contraceptives available). The US has cut funding to the UNFPA because its work in China. The bill ensures that no U.S. money goes to China unless the president certifies that certain conditions are met. (voluntary family planning, no forced abortions). Dr. Nafis Sadik, UNFPA's director, said the Chinese government has invited U.S. officials to monitor UNFPA programs. The United States has fulfilled only 1/3 of its 1994 $5.7 billion commitment.
    (Please go to WOA!s Lobbying Page if you wish to support this bill.)
  • Mar 24 1999 Xinua China Says Population and Sustainable Development Is Closely Linked. At a UN Preparatory Special Session of the General Assembly for the Review and Appraisal of the Cairo Conference Program of Action, Chinese representative Yang Kuifu said that that rural family planning program is integrated in China with measures taken for economic development and poverty alleviation. China's population is critical to the nation's subsistence and development, as well as to the stabilization of world population, (China has 1.24 billion of the world's 6 billion people) and China would join the efforts to implement the Program of Action and stabilize world population, he said.
  • Mar 24 1999 Reuters Most Urban Chinese (60%) Worried about Ecology
  • Mar 24 1999 Reuters Chinese Cities Fight to Save Environment. China has 9 out of 10 of the world's most polluted cities (from the World Resources Institute), is the 2nd largest source of greenhouse gas emissions, and the leading cause of death there is respiratory diseases. Acid rain falls on nearly one-third of the country. Dust from coal-burning stoves cakes cars and clothing. 70 % of the rivers are drying up because of industrial or agricultural diversions while many contain no fish due to pollution and others that used to freeze in winter now run free, because of warm industrial discharge. Excessive logging has caused soil erosion and increased flooding.
  • Mar 22 1999 Reuters World Population Seen at 9 Billion by 2050. U.N. projection 40 years ago was remarkably accurate in predicting a little over six billion for the year 2000. Developed nations projected to remain at current 1.2 billion. India to grow by 50%, Nigeria and Pakistan to both grow even more rapidly. China's rate has fallen to 1.8, below replacement level (but population momentum will keep it growing for some time). Germany, Japan, and Russia to decline in population (10%-20%)
  • World Water Day on March 22. Sponsored by the UN Environment Program, the theme is "Everyone lives downstream"
  • Mar 19 1999 ENN Hurricane Mitch worsened by environmental neglect, according to activist group Action for Community and Ecology in the Rainforests of Central America. Deforestation, mining and recently-cleared agricultural fields all contributed. US and World Bank policies promoted unregulated logging and mining.
  • Mar 19 1999 ENN UNEP (UN Environment Program) Sounds Alarm on Unsafe Water.
  • In the world, a child dies every 8 seconds from water-related diseases. Unsafe water causes 3 billion illnesses (half the population!) and 5 million deaths a year from diseases such as such as diarrhea, cholera, dengue fever, malaria, river blindness and trachoma. 20% of world's freshwater fish species have been pushed to the edge of extinction. 20% of the population faces unsafe water, the number to increase to 30% by 2050.

  • Mar 19 1999 Xinhua Red Cross Appeals to Curb Cholera in Africa. In Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Somalia, Mozambique, Zambia and Zimbabwe city slums cholera is widespread due to lack of water access, poor hygiene and sanitation, pollution and ignorance. Some pay 10% of their income for water.
  • Mar 19 1999 IPS Illegal Logging in Costa Rica Wounds Biologically Rich Region in the rich peninsula of Osa. Biodiversity lost because primary forest targeted. Costa Rica Costa Rica has 40 % of its national territory in forests, deciduous trees, mango groves and moors.
  • Mar 18 1999 Africa News Service US to Give 711 Million US Dollars Assistance to Africa $253 million allocated to family planning and protection of human health. $203 million for agriculture and small and medium-sized enterprises. $93.5 million for environmental protection and risks associated with global warming.
  • Mar 18 1999 Xinua Experts Warn Sea Level Rise along Bay of Bengal. If sea level rises even one meter rise due to global warming and green-house effects, 8.6 % of the land along the Bay would be totally submerged and 66.6 % of areas across Bangladesh likely to be vulnerable. 21% of the population lives in coastal areas.
  • Mar 17 1999 Reuters World Bank Urges Action to Save African Forests Africa forest area equal to the size of Germany has disappeared over the last 10 years. Deforestation is blamed on commercialisation, export of timber, and traditional slash-and-burn farming methods.
  • Mar 16 1999 AP Salmon Listings Could Have Wide Effects in the US Pacific Northwest affecting logging, home-building, lawn fertilizing and water and power rates. Nine wild salmon populations threatened or endangered. High-tech companies such as Intel produce harmful warmer runoff into streams.
  • Mar 16 1999 IPS Average US Home Owner Guilty of Endangering Forests wooden doors, paneling, or wooden tool handles may be from endangered forests. Home Depot sells doors from endangered Amazon rainforest Mahogany, or plywood from Lauan wood from Southeast Asia forests where old growth forests (not including parks) are predicted to be gone by 2010.
  • Mar 16 1999 InterPressService Environmentalists Blast World Trade Organization Timber Trade Plans.Liberalizing trade in timber products would increase global devastation of forests. U.S. government wants agreement to reduce global tariffs on wood products. The agreement says nothing about forest protection or sustainable logging practices. Proposed bans of the use of endangered tropical wood or on wood products that are likely to carry destructive pests could be found to be barriers to trade and in violation of WTO rules.
  • Mar 15 1999 ENN Defenders Praises New Science Report on National Forest Management from a panel appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture - 'Sustaining the People's Lands' as the basis for new regulations governing management of the nation's 156 national forests. It requires the agency to protect wildlife viability by maintaining well-distributed populations of individual species.
  • Mar 12 1999 ENN Acid rain robs soil nutrients. Acid rain, caused when emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide (primarily from automobile emissions and electric utility plants) react with water and oxygen in the air, speed acidification of forest soils by 38 %, striping the soil of nutrients and minerals, in a recent study in South Carolina.
  • Mar 12 1999 Xinhua 200,000 People Act to Rid Hebei China of White Pollution plastic waste materials, including plastic foam food containers are littering roads, railways, and trees
  • Mar 12 1999 Reuters Pope Faults Rich Countries for Damaging Environment "Serious environmental unbalances" had wreaked "particularly nefarious and disastrous consequences on various countries and the world itself." (The good news is that he recognizes that the world is in trouble. The bad news is that he doesn't recognize that it is the sheer numbers of rich people, and poor people, that are wrecking the environment. See March 11 Article on air pollution #1 cause of children's death)
  • Mar 12 1999 AP Mexican Environmentalists Report 50 Gray Whale Deaths, an all-time high. Environmentalists blame extremely salty water due to salt production.
  • Mar 11 1999 Reuters Children Suffer most in World's most Polluted City - Mexico City. Students banned from playing outside. Common in Mexico City were sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and total suspended particulates (TSPs), small particals of dust and heavy metals which cause damage to lung tissue. Beijing, Shanghai, Tehran and Calcutta not far behind. Respiratory disease is now the leading cause of death for children worldwide. 80 % of all air pollution caused lung infection deaths occur in children under five in Third World countries.
  • Mar 11 1999 Itar-Tass Russia Signs Kyoto Protocol to Climate Change Convention. Russia's current hothouse gas release is considerably less than its 1990 level which the Protocol agreement says to return to by 2000.
  • Mar 10 1999 Reuters U.N. Deadline Looms for Climate Pact Signatories
  • Mar 8 1999 AP Administration Announcing Plan to Reduce Factory Farm Pollution, nutrient runoff a major threat to water quality.
  • Mar 8 1999 Xinhua Tibet's Environment Not Polluted by Economic Development. One of the least polluted cities in China.
  • Mar 8 1999 Reuters Bangladeshi Capital Dhaka Pollution Blamed for 15,000 Deaths per Year Traffic congestion and poor infrastructure services impacts economic growth and the quality of life. 70% of the population lives in poverty. High content of lead in the air leads to ban on lead fuel and halt to imports of two-stroke motor vehicle engines.
  • Mar 8 1999 AP Turner Earmarks $12 Million to get U.S. to Pay its $1.3 Billion Dues for family planning. A Republican-sponsored amendment would have barred using U.S. funds to support international family planning organizations that seek changes in abortion policies, positive or negative.
  • Mar 8 1999 PRN Congressional Briefing on "The Economic and Social Consequences of Depopulation." Population Research Institute's Steven W. Mosher claims that falling birth rates may stall the less-developed world's economic take-off, (he's ignoring the projected doubling of population in these areas in the next 20 years and overlooking 'population momentum' due to the tremendous numbers of people in their child-bearing years). This briefing was probably sparsely attended - 8 inches of snow in DC kept most people away from Capitol Hill.
  • Mar 5 1999 Hot 1998 Devastated Corals according to a report from the US State Department. "It appears that only anthropogenic global warming could have induced such extensive coral bleaching simultaneously throughout the disparate reef regions of the world." "Human populations dependent on reef services face losses of marine biodiversity, fisheries, and shoreline protection." Losses may be difficult to reverse. 58% percent of the world's reefs already threatened by human coastal development and overexploitation of marine products.

  • Mar 5 1999 ENN Greenland's glaciers thinning, NASA finds -as much as 30 feet in 5 years some places
  • Mar 5 1999 WWI Nuclear Power Nears Peak As many as one-third of US and Canadian reactors are vulnerable to shut down in the next five years. Nuclear plants do displace the emission of large quantities of greenhouse gases from coal-fired plants, but few governments are seriously considering nuclear power as an alternative to fossil fuels, but are starting to invest in new energy technologies such as solar energy and wind power.
  • Mar 4 1999 Reuters Pollution Fight Begun at U.S. "Cancer Alley", a 85-mile long petrochemical corridor from Baton Rouge to New Orleans. POPs - Persistent organic pollutants, migrate by air and water, plus waterways are contaminated with dioxins and mercury. According to Greenpeace: "Toxins are showing up in indigenous peoples around the world who depend on their environment for life."
  • Mar 4 1999 AP Asian Air Pollution Reaching West Coast. Carbon monoxide, radon, aerosols, hydrocarbons, as well as Plus dust particles containing arsenic, copper, nickel, zinc and sulfur, all from East Asia, have been measured in the state of Washington. Dust from northern Africa, coming across the Atlantic Ocean, has been found in Texas.
  • Mar 4 1999 Reuters Shrinking Greenland Glacier Signals Global Warming. 1990s were the warmest years of the millennium. Temperature has risen 1.3 degrees Fahrenheit since the last century.
  • Mar 4 1999 ENN Expert makes sense of weird weather. "Zonal jet streams" and "Bermuda highs" which brought an unseasonably mild winter, may also bring strong storms to Mid and Eastern US this spring.
  • Mar 2 1999 PAI UN Population Fund Deserves Congressional Support From Population Action International president Amy Coen "When Congress eliminated funding for UNFPA for the current fiscal year, it cited UNFPA's new program in China as the reason. This rationale should be closely examined. Does it make sense to take money away from an organization that has worked for seven years to persuade the Chinese government to implement a fully voluntary family planning program in 32 project counties? The answer is 'No.'" "Whereas our own U.S. Agency for International Development operates in 70 countries, UNFPA works in double that number. It simply makes no sense to penalize all these countries for a program in just one of them."
  • Mar 3 1999 IPS Sterilisation in Venezuela Sparks Controversy. 6 month emergency plan described as "voluntary and for the indigent." Catholic Church objects. 80% of Venezualans live in poverty. 20% of pregnancies occur in ages 18 and under.
  • Mar 2 1999 AP Permanently Suspend UNFPA Funding says Population Research Institute: In a world of rapidly falling fertility rates, the UNFPA and its population control programs have outlived their usefulness -- and should be abolished. Mr 'Say No to Norplant' is at it again!
    And a pro-life charge by American Life League who says that the "UNFPA is among the leading promoters of abortion in the world"
    And support for the UNFPA by Population Aciton International (PAI)
  • Mar 1 1999 USAID Family Planning: The Key to Preventing Abortion and Saving Children's Lives From the USAID web page on POPULATION, HEALTH & NUTRITION
  • Mar 1 1999 NWF President Clinton Requests $425 million for Population Assistance Budget request for 2000 includes $425 million for Population Assistance. This request is a significant increase over the $385 million Congress appropriated for 1999. ..NWF Alert
  • Mar 1 1999 AP Enormously High Toxic Pollution Levels in Los Angeles, up to hundreds of times higher. Could cause up to 426 more cancer cases per million.
  • Mar 1 1999 Global Warming Would Foster Spread of Dengue Fever
  • Mar 1 1999 Africa News Service Water Water Crisis Looms as World Population Grows. By 2025, 2.8 billion people could be facing an acute water shortage. "To avoid a catastrophe... it is important to act now by reducing demand for water by slowing population growth," ground water reserves depleted at 25 percent more than replenishment rate.. John Hopkins School of Public Health.
  • Mar 1 1999 Xinhua Section of Yellow River Dry due to increased use of water for farmland after a sustained drought (since 1990). Sections of the river were dry nearly 226 days in 1997.
  • Mar 1 1999 Xinhua Warming Lengthening Europe's Seasons. Study from 1959 to 1993 shows growing season lengthened by an average of 10.8 days.
  • Feb, 1999 San Diego Union-Tribune Is Mexico controlling its population?  by Meredith Burke. Births: Mexico's Loss, US's Gain. Because of population momentum, during this decade nearly three women entered child age for each woman leaving it. The younger women are now entering their high-fertility 20s. But the National Demographic Study understates fertility. In deviation from the standard demographic practice, it averages the low number of number of children born to date per younger woman with the far higher cumulative number per older woman. The projected fertility of the younger women should have been included. It excludes births to Mexican nationals that occur elsewhere, primarily the United States. Mexican-born women bore 300,000 children in the United States in 1996. In this decade nearly 3 million infants lost to the Mexican population were gained by the United States, half of them by California. Mexico had 2.2 million births last year, which means is exported nearly one in 7 of its births. In the decade starting in 1989, Mexico's recorded population grew 10 million, but the United Nations had projected 18 million. Exported births accounted for 3 million of this 8 million shortfall. Much of the 5 million remaining can be found in numbers of legal immigrants admitted from Mexico to the United States, whose numbers rose from around almost 100,000 a year in the early 1990s to nearly 165,000 in 1997. An estimated 1.2 million Mexican nationals entered illegally.

  • Feb 23 1999 ENN Global warming may worsen effects of the El Niños, unusually frequent since the mid-1970s. There is growing evidence that heat from greenhouse gases is going into the oceans. El Niños may then transfer heat from ocean to atmosphere, resulting in larger and more frequent El Niños. Countries already prone to drought during an El Niño (Indonesia, Australia, Africa and Brazil) will be further affected.
  • Feb 1999 Unplanned Pregnancy Common Worldwide From a report by the Guttmacher Institute (AGI), worldwide, 4 in 10 pregnancies are unplanned - half of these end in abortion. The abortion rate is nearly the same for developed countries (39/1000) as for undeveloped countries (34/1000). In Eastern Europe, however the abortion rate is 90 per 1000 women. In the developed countries where smaller families are desired, an estimated 49% of pregnancies are unplanned, and 36% end in abortion, while in developing countries, an estimated 36% are unplanned, and 20% end in abortion. There are 26 million legal abortions per year, and an estimated 20 million illegal abortions.

  • Feb 26 1999 Xinhua Chinese Population Reaches 1.248 Billion, with the growth rate contining to decline.
  • Feb 26 1999 Reuters Scientists Use Iron in New Global Warming Tests in the Southern Ocean by New Zealand's National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research which show that injections of iron into the water increased phytoplankton which then absorbed carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas.
  • Feb 25 1999 Reuters Bad Air Threat to Central Americans. High levels of nitrogen dioxide, poisonous ozone and hazardous particles endangers health of impoverished people: respiratory illness caused deaths of 11,000 people El Salvador last year. Cost of related health care in the capital, San Salvador, up to $41.2 million for 1.5 million inhabitants.
  • Feb 25 1999 Reuters Arctic Effect Could Multiply Global Warming.Warmer tundra releases more carbon dioxide. The arctic covers 20% of the world and almost 1/3 of its soil carbon. According to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), average temperature is up 1.76 degrees from 1961-1990 tempuratures.
  • Feb 24 1999 States Western Governors Call for Dilution of Endangered Species Act, which they say places an unfair burden on Western states, restricting land-owner rights. Due to the region's rapid development problems are particularly acute. (Maybe they should be restricting growth, and planning 'smart growth' instead.)
  • Feb 24 1999 Xinhua Egypt's Population Exceeds 62 Million - grows by 2.4 persons a minute
  • Feb 24 1999 PR Environmentalists Call on Legislature to Say Yes to Energy Efficiency
  • Feb 23 1999 ENN Global warming may worsen effects of the El Niños, unusually frequent since the mid-1970s. There is growing evidence that heat from greenhouse gases is going into the oceans. El Niños may then transfer heat from ocean to atmosphere, resulting in larger and more frequent El Niños. Countries already prone to drought during an El Niño (Indonesia, Australia, Africa and Brazil) will be further affected.
  • Feb 23 1999 Xinhua China Speeds up Soil-Erosion Control. Big concern about the flooding of the Yangtze and Yellow rivers.
  • Feb 23 1999 AP Brazil Opens Dam Criticized as an Ecological Disaster. Spoiled area of tremendous biodiversity, according to International Rivers Network.

  • Feb 23 1999 WWF Launches New Campaign for Europe's Large Carnivores: wolves, brown bears, and lynx. Only 800 Iberian lynx left.
  • Feb 22 1999 Reuters Hungary Sees Largest Population Drop in 18 Yrs. Now at 10 million. Decline due to lowered living standards following the collapse of communism.
  • Feb 20 1999 Xinhua UNFPA Earmarks $30 Million for Ethiopia's population program. Ethiopia has an annual growth rate is over 3%, with a population of 58 million, 2nd largest in sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Feb 19 1999 Xinhua U.S. Supports Zimbabwe's Family Planning Program
  • Feb 16 1999 ENN Extreme weather's effect on health measured. In 1998: Flooding in East Africa resulted in large increases in incidence of malaria, Rift Valley fever and cholera. In SE Asia delayed monsoons and agricultural burning caused long-burning fires, leading to widespread respiratory illnesses and extensive wildlife losses. Hurricane Mitch,in Central America increased cholera, dengue fever, and malaria.
  • Feb 11 1999 UN Population Fund Hails Bill and Melinda Gates’ $2.2 Billion Donation to Fund Population and Health Activities Worldwide
  • Feb 7 1999 BBC Evidence of Water Tables Falling in Every Continent of the World, according to the World Watch Institute. Food shortages, fires predicted. If the Chinese consumed as much beef per person as in the USA, they would have to import an amount of grain equal to the entire US grain harvest each year. The forest fires in Indonesia last year accounted for more CO2 emissions than all of European industry.
  • Feb 3 1999 CNN Aerosols, clouds, climate get $25 million study. While greenhouse gases cause global warming, aerosol pollutants tend to cool the planet, making climate prediction models difficult. Click here for a report on the study.
  • Feb 18 1999 Reuters Hague Forum Ignores Depopulation says Population Research Institute (PRI) And here is PRI's (Just say "No" to Norplant!) web page if anyone is wondering what kind or organization it is. In addition, further claims on aging by this group are here. The site is mostly editorial. I saw little evidence of the 'research' it's name would imply.
  • Feb 18 1999 Reuters In Argentina, Reforestation Not what it Seems New reforestation law, designed to attract investment dollars, promises a 50-year guarantee on investments and exempts investors from certain taxes, and also to help the environment by absorbing the greenhouse gase carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, most of the species used in reforestation are foreign, for example eucalyptus, quick-growing trees of one species which yield lots of timber but erode the soil because of soil preparation required, and decrease biodiversity by crowding out native trees. If the new plantations should burn down, which happens, all the carbon dioxide which has been store will be released right back into the atmosphere. Petrochemical companies should instead reduce emissions of polluting greenhouse gases, according to Greenpeace.
  • Feb 15 1999 Reuters Britain Launches 'Green' Foreign Policy. Climate Change Challenge Fund would help developing countries combat global warming and provide them with access to environmental technologies.
  • Feb 12 1999 ENN Tourism and environment: Enemies or allies? No real controls. Ecotourism: travel to natural places which preserves the environment and sustains the well-being of the local people.
  • Feb 12 1999 ENN Pew climate change think tank grows
  • Feb 12 1999 Reuters Facts on World Population, Set to Top Six Billion World population reached one billion in 1804, two billion in 1927, and will triple that, 72 years later, in Ocotber 1999. The world is adding about 78 million more people every year, equivalent to a city the size of San Francisco every three days. Birth rates are falling worldwide but death rates are declining even faster. The richest 20 percent of humanity consumes 86 percent of all goods and services, while the poorest fifth consumes just 1.3 percent.
  • Feb 12 1999 Xinhua New Zealand's Population Exceeds 3.8 Million. Growth slowing due to slack-off in migration. Half the population is over the age of 33.9 years.
  • Feb 11 1999 IPS Children at Risk from Global Air Pollution in rapidly expanding urban areas, impact greater for children. 40% of the world's children live in cities in developing countries where breathing the air is the equivalent of smoking two packs of cigarettes a day. Respiratory disease is number one cause of children's deaths worldwide. Mexico City is at the top of the list, most toxic to children, followed by Beijing, Shanghai, Teheran, Calcutta, Bombay and Delhi, and the major cities in the Philippines and Brazil. Coal-fired power plants and leaded gas are the top culprits.
  • Feb 11 1999 Heritage Forests Campaign Says Administration Roadless Area Policy off Track; Declares 'Internet Day of Action'. http://www.ourforests.org Send a postcard to Clinton and Gore to protect America's heritage forests. The roadless policy is not going to work.
  • Feb 11 1999 Xinhua WWF Warns of Continued Threats to Tiger: population declined by 95 percent in the last 100 years. Only 5,000 - 7,200 tigers remaining. Poaching, habitat loss, loss of prey are cited as the causes.
  • Feb 11 1999 Xinhua Geothermal Effects Produced by Large Mountain Ranges May Result in Ozone Losses
  • Feb 11 1999 Reuters Brazil Suspends Issuing of Amazon Clearing Permits. 6,500 square miles totally cleared in 1998.
  • Feb 11 1999 M2 Indian Government Measures to Reduce Vehicular Pollution in Delhi and Surrounding Regions. Vehicles contribute 70% of pollution. In 1970, it was only 20%.
  • Feb 11 1999 AP Quick Japanese O-K for Viagra Draws Protest on Pill Ban The birth-control pill awaiting approval for nine years
  • Feb 11 1999 ENN Bighorn sheep face extinction.Due to diseases carried by domestic sheep and predation by mountain lions. Down to 100 sheep, biologists resort to captive breeding plan (according to an article in the Sacramento Bee)
  • Feb 10 1999 Reuters Global Warming May Seriously Alter U.S. Farming
  • Feb 10 1999 IPS U.N.: The Hague: Battle to Liberalize Abortion Laws Undecided Legal restrictions have little clear effect on lowering abortion rates, but family planning does.
  • Feb 10 1999 AP Hillary Clinton Urges End to Forced Family Planning. She agrees with the policy to stood by Washington's policy of ensuring that abortion be "safe, legal and rare"
  • Feb 4-12 1999 The Hague International Forum - will review of 20-year Program of Action from the U.N. International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in September 1994 in Cairo, Egypt. Budget shortfalls mean that 170 million people who would have opted for contraception would be unable to practice it, unintended pregnancies would rise by 230 million while abortions would increase by 92 million. An additional 6.5 million infants and 2.4 million children would die from inadequate health care.
  • Feb 9 1999 ENN Disturbing soil spurs carbon release. According to a study in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California: after logging, 30 percent of the carbon stored in forest soils was released.
  • Feb 9 1999 El Dorado County Land Plan Tossed Out. California: a Superior Court judge threw out the county's 6-year in the making land plan because it promised that it wouldn't cause an urban invasion to the rural and agricultural areas, but instead has redirected the boundaries for urban sprawl, allowing for substantial development. The county's population was predicted to grow from 148,000 to 370,000 by 2015. Excessive water consumption and traffic congestion were two other concerns.
  • Feb 9 1999 Xinhua Population Explosion Threatens Africa's Future Escalating population growth is exceeding sustainable yield of life support systems. Suffering from dwindling forests, eroding soils, desertification and falling water tables. 45 percent of the population under the age of 15 in most countries.
  • Feb 8 1999 Columnists Claims Gore's 'Smart Growth' a Dumb Idea
  • Feb 8 1999 Government helps prevent alien invasions Damage exceeds $122 billion a year, includes reduced crop yields, less plant bio-diversity. Noxious weeds invade 5,000 acres of western wetlands a day (Dept. of Interior). The newly formed Invasive Species Council was created by Clinton to fight these alien species.
  • Feb 8 1999 Itar-Tass One in Every 5 Russians Suffers from Malignant Tumours. Increase of 5% in 5 years due to massive atmospheric pollution from industrial discharges.
  • Feb 8 1999 ANS Zambia: More School Years Lowering Fertility Rate
  • Feb 8 1999 Xinhua Ozone, Overfishing Threaten UV-Sensitive Krill
  • Feb 8 1999 AP Environmentalists losing battle to save W. African Ivory Coast jungles Illegal bush meat hunters, rare tropical wood harvesters and small slash and burn cocoa and coffee farmers, struggling to survive, have eliminated 5 - 7 million acres from the original 70 million acres of forest preserves. Jungles may be down to 1/10 their size 20 years ago.
  • Feb 7 1999 Xinua Tanzania Facing Environmental Problems Desertification threatens 60 percent of it's arable land. Use of wood for fuel by increasing numbers of people causes a loss of 300,000 to 400,000 hectares of forests a year. Other problems include lack of quality water, environmental pollution, loss of wildlife habitats and biodiversity due to poaching, deterioration of aquatic ecosystems, increasing climatic variability and bio-invasions.
  • Feb 5 1999 ENN Dolphins studied for pollution's impactsThe dolphin genome and the human genome are basically the same. Scientists have observe maring mammal sporadic die-offs, diseased animals and reduced reproductive success.
  • Feb 5 1999 ENN Human impact on Australia land formidable. Erosion, sediment deposition and change in river systems are proving to have happened in as few as 30 or 40 years.
  • Feb 5 1999 ENN South American guanacos face extinction
  • Feb 5 1999 ENN Pollution credits: the science isn't in yet CO2 in the atmosphere may double by 2050 - 2100. Temperate forests of conifers and broad-leafed plants such as maples, oaks and birches (including the temperate forests of North America) form the largest terrestrial sink for carbon.
  • Feb 5 1999 ENN Carbon storage key to fighting global warming Atmospheric carbon dioxide continues to increase by 3.5 billion tons a year, due to deforestation and use of fossil fuels. Farming practices such as reduced tillage; increased use of rotational crops such as alfalfa, clover and soybeans and by a return of animal wastes to the soil, can cause significant reductions. Converting agricultural lands to forest or grasslands also helps.
  • Feb 5 1999 Reuters UN to Review Plans to Stabilize World's Population "Women are now having an average of 2.8 children, compared with 3.0 five years earlier." "The planet seems to have averted -- at least for now -- the threat of a population bomb. The danger now is that we will declare victory and go home," - UNFPA. What we do now will make the difference between 8.9 billion and 10.7 billion in 2050.
  • Feb 4 1999 AP As Global Population Nears 6 Billion, Nations Review Strategy. Delegates coming from 180 countries, with First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton officially opening it. Population has jumped 20% in just 12 years, from 5 billion to almost 6 billion. $7 billion short in planned spending on global population issues. US biggest contributer at $3 billion.
  • Feb 4 1999 Xinhua Australia's Population to Reach 26m by 2051. Currently 18.53 million. Average birth rate of 1.775 children.Migrants contribute 43.2 percent of its growth.
  • Feb 4 1999 Itar-Tass Russia Population Fell in 1998. Population now at 146.3 million
  • Feb 4 1999 IPS World Bank Urged to Boost "Green" Energy - asked by the Friends of the Earth and the Union of Concerned Scientists to boost support for renewable energy development (wind, solar and geothermal power) to meet the needs of the 2 billion poor people in the world's rural areas, who have no electricity, without contributing further to climate change. Too many fossil- fuel projects have been approved by the World Bank.
  • Feb 4 1999 IPS Fears of Eco-Disaster in Caspian Sea due to oil pipeline. Highly political nature of the oil rush has caused companies and governments to bypass environmental considerations. Pollution and a resulting decline in fisheries and in endangered bird species is threatened.
  • Feb 4 1999 PRNewswire Nature Conservancy Helping to Eradicate Aliens Locally Second greatest threat -- just behind habitat loss -- to our nation's ecological health. Clinton wants to broaden Federal effort against invasive species.
  • Feb 4 1999 Inter Press Service World's Youth Demand a Voice in Environmental PolicyYouth leaders from 29 countries meet in Kenya, tell how countries are impacted.
  • Feb 2 1999 AP Logging Poses Threat to Potential AIDS Vaccine HIV-1 found to originate in chimpanzees endangered due to hunting of the chimpanzees for food and international logging of its disappearing rainforest habitat in west-central Africa. Uncovering the reason why chimps remain unaffected while carrying the virus, may lead to finding a cure or vaccine. Logging roads have provided unprecedented access to the chimpanzees, gorillas, and monkeys as a source of food. Info on this from Rainforest Action Network
  • Feb 2 1999 Xinua USAID Provided $3 Billion for Family Planning Overseas over the past five years to family planning and reproductive health programs in developing countries.
  • Feb 1 1999 Xinhua UNEP Report Stresses Environmental Impact of Fire. Most of the fires set by locals for land clearing or were caused by extreme drought conditions. Dangers are carbon dioxide and methane gases, greenhouse gases leading to global warming, photo-chemical production of ground-level ozone which is a pollutant with a adverse impact on all living systems, and large amounts of particulate matter, which absorbs and scatters incoming solar radiation and impact climate systems, and also causes health problems upon entering the human respiratory system.
  • Feb 1 1999 Xinhua Suzhou Reports Negative Population Growth. First negative growth since the 60s. Average population density now at 600 persons per sq km. Decrease is the result of the family planning and of changed ideas about human reproduction during economic and social progress. Population growth rate went from 22.05 per thousand in the 1960s, to 18.91 per thousand in 1970, 8.5 per thousand in 1979, and 6.02 per thousand in 1980s.
  • Feb 1 1999 PCI Global Warming: Is It Worse Than We Thought? Dire Predictions from Britain's Hadley Center for Climate Prediction and Research - Amazon rain forest to turn into desert by 2050; land temperatures will rise by an average 10 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the next century; malaria will threaten larger areas of the world--including Europe; runaway greenhouse effect after 2050; elevated temperatures will reduce U.S. wheat and corn yields by as much as 10 percent.
  • Feb 1 1999 PCI Keeping the Promise: Cairo+5 In many regions of the world fundamental religious movements have gained momentum in recent decades, challenging progress in gender equality. Huge disparities still exist in women's status, family size, child health, access to sexual and reproductive health services, and educational opportunities for the young, especially girls. Social progress is also constrained by the fact that many donor countries--notably the United States--are not meeting their share of the funding goals agreed to in Cairo.
  • Jan 30 1999 Xinhua Pakistan's Population Growth Rate Declines. World's seventh most populous country growth rate has slowed from 3 percent in 1991, to 2.6 percent in 1997, and 2.3 percent in 1998. However, gross rate will remain about the same since more and more people will be entering the fertile age. 5.5 children are being born per household.

  • Jan 28 1999 ANS Indigenous People Demand Inclusion, Biodiversity Rights Indigenous Peoples' Biodiversity Network (including include the Maasai of Kenya and Tanzania, the Aborigines of Australia, the Twa pygimies of Congo, the Red Indians of North America, the Ogoni of Nigeria, the Nambiquara and Makuxi in Brazil, the Barabaig of Tanzania, the Ashinaninka of Peru and the Dayak in Malaysia) wants recognition of their rights over their traditional territories. Indigenous people an important key to sustainable development. About 3/4 of 121 prescription drugs derived from plants were discovered because of their prior use in indigenous medicine.

  • Jan 27 1999 PAI Nations Fail to Meet Pledge to Improve Health, Slow Population. United States and Japan account for more than half the shortfall of goal was set by 180 nations at the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo. Total global support $1.4 billion. The United States contributed more than any other country ($640 million last year) but lagged in its contribution as a share of wealth and population (only 1/10 of one percent of US GNP).
  • Jan 27 1999 AP Global warming killing the spectacular Seychelles reefs (Victoria near Madagascar). 80 percent killed. Coral responds to warm water by bleaching -- expelling the algae that gives them nutrition
  • Jan 27 1999 WWF World Wildlife Fund Wants Global Ban on DDT - Used to control mosquitos in many developing nations, is linked to declines in wildlife (such as the near extinction of the bald eagle) and possible risk to human health. Human breast milk in Mexico and South Africa found to contain a breakdown product of DDT. Retained in the soil for many years. When released into the atmosphere, it travels thousands of miles to colder areas where it returns to Earth and builds up in body fat of wildlife and humans.
  • Jan 27 1999 Reuters Antarctic Ice Melt May Come in Next Generation - Sea levels could raise as much as 20 ft, due to global warming, causing cold global sea currents and even a mini ice age!
  • Jan 26 1999 Xinhua UN Urges Sustained Development in Africa - from 1986 to 1997, population in sub-Saharan Africa grew by 35 %, food production declined by 8 %, and agricultural land decreased by 25%.
  • Jan 26 1999 ANS Kenya-Family Men Apathetic to Family Planning Condom associated with illicit sex while vasectomy is associated with loss of manhood. Men fear their wives might become unfaithful if they use contraceptives
  • Jan 26 1999 AP Oceans Being Invaded by Exotic Species, Threatening Fishing - Invaders devour native species, alter food chains and change whole ecosystems.
  • Jan 26 1999 AP Clinton and Gore seek $4 billion to fight global warming
  • Jan 26 1999 Watch your population language - 'population control' as a term is inaccurate and insensitive.
  • Jan 26 1999 ENS European Biodiversity Shrinking According to the European Centre for Nature Conservation 38% of bird species, 30 % of amphibians and 45% of reptiles in Europe are threatened.
  • Jan 25 1999 ENN Bleached coral (Florida Keys) could be environment warning
  • Jan 28 1999 Scientists Warn Against Ignoring Climate Change. American Geophysical Union cites growing evidence that human-produced chemicals linked to global warming. "The present level of scientific uncertainty does not justify inaction".
  • The burning of fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas produces carbon dioxide, a gas that traps heat in Earth's atmosphere as in a greenhouse. If emissions of the heat-trapping gases are not reduced, the surface temperature will rise by another 2 to 6 degrees by the end of the 21st century, producing widespread climatic disruptions.

  • Jan 24 1999 NYTimes Problems from Bacteria and Viruses Mount in Warming Oceans. Evidenced by dying coral, diseased shellfish, and waters infected with human viruses. 10% of world's coral dead, like the canaries in the mine. Florida coastal waters polluted by septic tanks have infected swimmers, windsurfers, and boaters, as well as oysters
  • Jan 23 1999 CNN Dead Zone in Gulf of Mexico Traced to Fertilizer Use by Farmers, which washes down the Mississippi River, triggering a bloom of algae which strips the water of oxygen. Most fish and shrimp have left, leaving behind a vast "dead zone."
  • Jan 22 1999 ENN Scientists rule out one threat of Antarctic collapse
  • Jan 22 1999 World Watch New century to be marked by growing threats, opportunities. Rapid deforestation, falling water tables, and accelerating climate change could undermine economies around the world. In the last 100 years, world population grew by more than 4 billion-three times the number of people when the century began. At the same time, the use of energy and raw materials grew more than ten times. Protein demands projected to double in the next century, but the oceanic fish catch has plateaued over the last decade, and The world's oceans are being pushed beyond the breaking point. In Africa, economic growth is already failing to keep up with human needs.
  • Jan 22 1999 World Watch Eco-Isolationism Hurts the Environment More than a billion hectares of arid lands are already degraded worldwide, an area greater in size than China. Hundreds of millions of people suffer the consequences, which can include malnutrition, forced migration and economic ruin. 74 percent of Americans who knew about the Kyoto protocol said they approve it.
  • Jan 23 1999 ENN Landfills could be an environmental asset. Burying waste paper and wood permanently locks away large amounts of carbon that would otherwise escape into the atmosphere. U.S. wants to count landfills as "carbon sinks" under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol
  • Jan 22 1999 China Having to Deal with Aging Population
  • Jan 20 1999 South Pole ice cap shows global climate change. Crack found in the ice cap If all the ice in the South Pole melted, the world's sea level would rise 65 - 70 meters.
  • Jan 20 1999 Malawi: Growing Number of Men Accept Vasectomy. Often thought of as a form of castration, community outreach programs have taught that vasectomy is a cheap and convenient method of family planning. Strong cultural beliefs, which regard children as a source of wealth, also undermine the method. Condoms are still the mostly widely used method of contraception here. Malawi's annual population growth rate is 3.2 percent, averaging 6.7 children per woman. Its contraceptive prevalence rate stands at 14 percent.
  • Jan 20 1999 Clinton vows more efforts to protect environment. In his State of the Union speech US President Clinton said that the most fateful new challenge facing the American people is the threat of global warming and he proposed spending 2 billion dollars to reduce air pollution, to protect natural resources, and to take action to reduce greenhouse gases.
  • Jan 20 1999 Population SADC States Urged to Tackle Population Issues. Southern Africa Forum on Population and Development (SAFPD) agenda includes environment, gender, empowerment of women and reproductive health. 64% of the population of the southern Africa region are under 25 years, at about 390 million.
  • Jan 19 1999 China pollution reduction. Sulfur dioxide and acid rain a big problem. See related story on Jan 6 1999.
  • Jan 19 1999 Russian crisis has helped the environment due to fall in industrial production since the August financial crisis. Amount of air, water and other pollution has fallen by several percent in each category. Enviornmental degradation includes low quality of the drinking water, air pollution from automobiles in poor condition and use of low-quality fuel, lake in the Ural mountains poisoned by radiation risks leaking into nearby rivers and water supply, and badly managed forest fires.
  • Jan 19 1999 Akaki River in Ethiopia said toxic. Tanneries, breweries and textile factories discharge their waste into the river.
  • Jan 19 1999 Northern ozone thinning could pose threat: may allow dangerous ultraviolet radiation to reach Europe and North America. An international agreement was earlier this decade to phase out refrigerants and spray propellants that can destroy ozone, but the chemicals already released remain in the air for years.

  • Jan 19 1999 Russia to Help Mexico Resolve Air Pollution Problem using air-ionizing antennas.
  • Jan 19 1999 Forest Protection Gains Great Economic Benefits in China. Forest cover has doubled in the Liaoning Province since 1949 when the provincial government took measures to protect local forest, realizing benefits worth 50 billion yuan (6 billion U.S. dollars) and the conservation of more than 12 billion tons of water per year. Also methane-generation projects have been built to substitute for firewood for rural residents. Increased rainfall and reduced soil erosion have resulted.
  • Jan 17 1999 World Watch Institute Claims Economic and Social Collapse Could Be Coming. From 1999 State of the World report. Cites growing efforts to recycle raw materials in several industries, and development of alternative energy sources, particularly wind power. Without a new economy based on renewable resources, the current rapid deforestation, falling water tables and accelerating climate change could undermine economies around the world during the next century.
  • Jan 17 1999 Sex education to halt population boom
  • Jan 16 1999 China: degradation melts Yangtze's might. Glaciers which are the source of the Yantze, have retreated 300 meters in 12 years. Excessive grazing,have caused desertification of grasslands, which have changed the climate.
  • Jan 16 1999 Pollution chokes Delhi. 2.5 million people nation-wide die each year from pollution-related illnesses. 500,000 vehicles in 1980, now up to 3.3 million. Benzene, a carcinogen, at 20 times Euopean standard.
  • Jan 15 1999 Time to act on climate change, ecologist says - from Jan 8 99 issue of Science.
  • Jan 15 1999 Zimbabwe: Carving Trees into Extinction
  • Jan 15 1999 Population Growth Rate in Tanzania Too High. Growth rate is 2.8 percent, GDP is 3-4 % per year, but 8-10 % needed. Population of 30 million will double in 25 years. The government has taken measures to improve girls' access to education. Women are guaranteed a certain percentage of representation in parliment and local councils.
  • Jan 14 1999 Uncertainty a factor in global warming debate Global warming is happening and the warming is at least in part due to human-induced emissions of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide.
  • Jan 14 1999 More Men Respond to Reproductive Health Issues. from Family Health International In Kenya, Morocco, Pakistan, Egypt and Bangladesh less than 1/2 to 1/3 of men want to have another child. HIV and other STDs have made men more aware of protection such as condoms. In half the surveyed countries, 90 % approve of using contraception.
  • Jan 14 1999 Family Planning Goes on Line in China Basic Views and Policies on Population and Development is one of the topics on the new web site.
  • Jan 14 1999 Development Model Mars Quality of Life in Panama. Exploitation of natural resources here include: 6 times the world average usage of agrochemicals in agriculture and overexploitation of hillside lands (leading to destruction of the organic layer of the soil needed for food production), spillage of cyanide compounds used in mining near rivers, felling of forests (1/3 gone in forty years), and fecal waste in drinking water. 50,000 people in lived in Panama in 1974. Population has quadrupled to more than 200,000.
  • Jan 14 1999 Vicious Cycle of Global Warming Hits Ocean Study. Study in Southern Ocean shows global warming may promote the growth of algae that do not absorb carbon dioxide, setting off a vicious cycle in which the earth gets even hotter.
  • Jan 13 1999 Environmental groups say government moving too slowly to protect fisheries
  • Jan 13 1999 Mussels: the nation's most endangered family
  • Jan 12 1999 No laughing matter: South Platte River emitting N2O as a result of effluents from wastewater treatment plants and agricultural fields - study by USGS. Nitrous oxide acts as a catalyst in ozone depletion.

  • Jan 12 1999 California rockfish near point of no return, due to overfishing
  • Jan 11 1999 Global Warming Aggravating Water Shortage
  • in North China.

  • Jan 11 1999 Beijing Fighting Dust Pollution- Due to construction, and coal and sand transport vehicles, Beijing is one of the ten most polluted cities in the world.
  • Jan 11 1999 UNEP Environment Policy Meeting to Be Held in Nairobi
  • Jan 10 1999 BBC Bangladesh Arsenic Water Well Crisis: 40% are too contaminated for drinking water, according to World Bank
  • Jan 8 1999 Researchers try hot air to cool global warming by retrofiting coal-fired power plants with a power system that heats air to 2,000 degrees F.

  • Jan 8 1999 Lopsided Male-Female Ratio in China Grows. 120 men for every 100 women
  • Jan 7 1999 Global warming is for real, NASA says. Year warmest on record.
  • Jan 7 1999 Africa: Experts Call for Universal Policies on Protection of Global Environment. Biological ecosystems shared between countries have been ignored.
  • Jan 7 1999 Nigerian author, Chinua Achebe, named UNFPA goodwill ambassador. Former goodwill ambassadors are: Ted Turner, US philanthropist, actress and community activist Jane Fonda, Keiko Kishi, actress and writer, Manisha Koirala, India film actress; Safia El-Emary, Egypt, actress, Jamal Soliman, Syria, expert on theater arts,

  • Jan 7 1999 Population and the Millennium - Megacities of the 21st Century From World News Tonight with Peter Jennings. From Carl Haub of the Population Reference Bureau. “We know approximately the number of future parents. What we don’t know is the number of children they are going to have.” There will be 21 cities with over 10 million population and only two of them will be in the industrialized world: New York and Los Angeles. George Moffitt, author of Critical Masses: 1 million more people every 4 Days: It’s like slowing a speeding train, you don’t do it overnight.

  • Jan 7 1999 Indian government bans quinacrine, the chemical sterilization agent
  • Jan 6 1999 Fossils provide evidence of a warm Arctic. An earlier global warming caused by volcanic eruptions might help us understand how our planet might react to the increased carbon dioxide from car exhaust, coal plants and other burning of fossil fuels.
  • Jan 6 1999 United Efforts Needed to Solve Beijing Pollution. Coal consumption has increased by 32 percent and the number of automobiles doubled in last 10 years. Boilers should use low-sulfur coal, instead of inferior grade, high-polluting fuel, to reduce airborne particulates. Sulfur dioxide causes diseases in human respiratory systems and results in acid rain.
  • Jan 6 1999 Human Activity Threatens Life in the Future. Atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has increased by 30 per cent since pre-industrial times. The last 15 years have seen 10 of the warmest years on record.
  • Jan 5 1999 Success story: "morning-after pills" more available: Washington state law now permits emergency contraceptives to be prescribed directly by pharmacists directly after business hours on a week night or over the weekend. Requests for the morning-after pill soared after the law went into effect.
  • Jan 5 1999 India: Plastic Bags Menace Towns and Cities. Polybags litter roadsides, trees and bushes. Bags containing waste left on the street for collection ends up in the stomach of foraging cattle and choke drains causing sewer water to overflow into drinking water supplies.
  • Jan 5 1999 Shanghai's Temperatures Getting Warmer
  • Jan 5 1999 Worrying Trends Mark Nambia's Population Growth. Due to shortage of suitably trained health services people, Namibians are not changing their reproductive behaviour. Population is expected to grow from 1,75 million to 2,6 million in 2011, with 42 per cent under age 15. Namibia has one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in Africa.
  • *

  • Jan 2 1999 Australia's Unique Marsupials Flee Warming Trend Two tree kangaroos and five kinds of possum may be highly susceptible to global warming. A two degree warming. extensive clearing of lowland rainforest has destroyed much of the habitat of the Bennetts and Lumholtz tree kangaroos.
  • Jan 1 1999 Water Wars Forecast If Solutions Not Found Over-use, due to population growth, waste and pollution are turning water into a scarce resource. According to former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, "Based on population projections alone, some 33 countries are expected to have chronic water shortages by 2025,"